Tagged

vogue

  1. Fashion Fridays ~ Gladys Perint Palmer

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    Gladys Perint Palmer is an esteemed illustrator, journalist, and educator. She studied at two of the finest fashion schools in the world, Central Saint Martins, and at the Parsons School of Design. She is currently the Executive Vice President of Artistic Development at San Francisco’s Academy of Art.

    Born in 1947 Budapest, Hungary, Perint Palmer and her family moved to England when she was young. She learned to draw from her mother and taught herself to write by reading and rewriting over and over. She studied 3 years of Fashion Design at the Central Saint Martins in London, under the guidance of illustrator Elizabeth Suterand. She then travelled across the pond to study Fashion Illustration at Parsons School of Design in New York.

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  2. Fashion Fridays ~ Michaele Vollbracht

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    Michaele Vollbracht is a fashion designer and illustrator. He has collaborated with big brands and helmed his own groundbreaking label. In 1980, he was given the Coty American Fashion Critics Award (fashion’s Oscar) and in 1981, Newsweek magazine dubbed him “a fashion comet.”

    Vollbracht was born 17 November 1947 in Quincy, Illinois. He attended the Parsons School of Design (now Parsons The New School for Design), where he earned the school’s highest honour, the Golden Thimble Award. He began his career in fashion working as a design assistant for one of New York’s most famous fashion designers, Geoffrey Beene. He later joined the design team of Donald Brooks.

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  3. Fashion Fridays ~ Pierre Simon (1907 – 1999)

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    Pierre Simon was a French fashion illustrator. Born in 1907 he started his career in the 1920s and was particularly active during the 1940s and 1950s. Predominately illustrating for advertisements, he worked with Christian Dior, Nina Ricci, Boucheron Jewelry and Orlane Cosmetics. His work also appeared in the French edition of Vogue magazine.

    Simon’s early work exhibit stylized elongated faces and hands, although his figures were relatively short. His women looked hard-nosed, similar to popular 1930s femme fatales of the time. As his style developed the reverse became true. He started drawing face that were more realistically proportioned, while he stretched out the body. Long necks and legs made his women look more delicate and elegant.

    Simon’s evolving style is a sign of the influence the artist trends had on him. His loaded ink brush technique is very reminiscent of René Gruau’s work. This is particularly noticeable looking at Simon’s 1950s illustrations. His later work more resembled traditional advertising illustration of the time, then it did fashion illustrations. Throughout his career he continuing to refine his own style. Perfecting the use of limited lines and colour, in just a few brush strokes he could create confident and engaging men and women that would effortlessly capture the viewers gaze.

    It is difficult to find a lot of Pierre Simon’s illustrations online, but a great place to start is HPrints.

  4. Fashion Fridays ~ René Bouché (1905 – 1963)

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    René Bouché was an artist and fashion illustrator, known for his work in Vogue magazine and his social portraiture. Born Robert August Buchstein, 1905, in Austro-Hungarian Prague. By the age of 15, he was earning a living from illustration. At age 21, he studies art history at Munich University under the tutelage of Heinrich Wölfflin.

    In 1927, he moved to Berlin and adopted the name René Robert Bouché. In the early 1930s, shortly after Hitler came to power, Bouché left for Paris. There he studied at Amédée Ozenfant’s atelier, l’Académie Ozenfant. From 1934, Bouché contributed drawings to the magazine Plaisir de France and advertising for Nestlé.

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  5. Fashion Fridays ~ Pierre Mourgue (1890 – 1969)

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    Pierre Mourgue was born in France, 1890. He was a regular contributor to the premiere French fashion magazine, La Gazette du Bon Ton. As such, the influential magazine was picked up by publishers, Condé Nast, who distributed it across American under the name, Gazette du Bon Genre. The magazine’s artwork was comprised of many talented French illustrators, including Paul Iribe, Pierre Brissaud, Georges Lepape. Condé Montrose Nast enlisted all of the La Gazette du Bon Ton artist for another one of his magazines, Vogue.

    Pierre Mourgue was based in Paris but made frequent trips to New York, as such, his illustrations were regularly on and inside the covers of Vogue magazine. His ink and gouache illustrations brought a Parisian flair to the American edition.

    Mourgue’s style updated with art movements. A lot of his early work has a strong Art Deco influence, with his 1940s and 1950s work resembling the American advertising illustrations that we regularly associate with that era. His illustrations often get compared to Pierre Brissaud’s, for their use of exaggerated figures and their disposition for pretty girl.

    Mourgue illustrated for fashion designers Nina Ricci, Christian Dior, and Marcel Rochas. Bringing their garments to life with his careful observation, and ability to infuse a sense of fun and coolness.

    You can see a large collection of Pierre Mourgue’s illustrations over at Hprints.

  6. Fashion Fridays ~ René Bouët-Willaumez (1900 – 1979)

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    René Bouët-Willaumez was a French aristocrat born in Brittany, in 1900. After abandoned engineering for art, he began working for Vogue in 1929. Joining the industry in the midst of change, where photography was becoming the dominant means of reporting on fashion trends. This, however, did not hold Willaumez back. His unhesitating and incisive ink drawings illustrated the hubris and elegance of fashion in a way that had not been seen carving out a demand for himself.

    Within just a few years, Willaumez had honed his craft and his monogram “RBW” became a familiar fixture on the pages and covers of Vogue magazine. By the mid-1930s he was heralded as top of his profession, with his only substantial equal being Carl Erickson. Willaumez was a few years younger than Erickson, yet a professional, sometimes fractious, rivalry developed between the two and remained through the course of their careers.

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  7. Fashion Fridays ~ Ricardo Fumanal

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    Ricardo Fumanal was born in Huesca, Spain in 1984. After studying graphic and advertising design, he moved to Barcelona where worked as a graphic designer, collaborating with various studios on a range of projects. Whilst in Barcelona he also furthered his studies, this time in printing techniques and illustration.

    After cultivating both his “youthful spirit” and an array of visual language techniques, Fumanal moved to London. Working with clients such as Moncler, Lou Dalton, Revlon, Mango, Fred Perry, Richard Nicoll, and magazines such as TIME, Dazed & Confused, Vogue Japan, and The Daily Telegraph.

    Illustrating in the traditional manner of marker, pencil and ink on paper, Fumanal’s wide range of influences including fine art, fashion and photography is applied throughout his work. His understanding of layout and graphic design is also evident in his work. Fumanal’s beautiful and realistic portraits are distorted through the use of fading lines and purposely uncomfortable compositions. Layering and obscuring objects to give us just enough, but rarely allowing the audience to see the person in full. Quite a clever technique to make us wanting to see and know more.