Tagged

japan

  1. Manga Mondays ~ Hajime Isayama

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    Hajime Isayama is the Japanese manga artist of Shingeki no Kyojin (Attack on Titan). The series has become a phenomenal commercial success. As of July 2015, the manga has 52.5 million copies in circulation. Its popularity was spurred on with the release of the anime adaptation of the same name.

    Isayama would doodle “ugly stuff” as a child. By the time he reached high school, that was almost all he would draw. It was during high school that his ambition to make a living from drawing manga grew. And so He began submitting his artwork to contests. After high school, he enrolled in a manga design course at Kyushu Designer Gakuin.

    He submitted a one-shot called Shingeki no Kyojin to the Magazine Grand Prix (MGP). Which won him his first ever prize, the “Fine Work” award. At age twenty, Isayama moved to Tokyo to pursue a career in manga. He left the idea behind him, with no intention of revisiting it.

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  2. Manga Mondays ~ George Kamitani

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    George Kamitani is based in Hiroshima City, Japan. He began a career in video games in 1993, with Capcom’s Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom. He has since gained a reputation for his beautiful hand-drawn characters and landscapes.

    In 2002, he founded Vanillaware (originally named Puraguru), serving as President and Lead Artist. The company’s first game, Odin Sphere, was released in 2007, published by Atlus. Kamitani and team since released a string of cult titles including Princess Crown, Muramasa The Demon Blade and GrimGrimoire.

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  3. Manga Mondays ~ Toshinho

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    Toshinho is a freelance artist from Japan. He majored in fine art and began his creative career in video game development, working on titles including Metal Gear Solid 5, Final Fantasy Tactics and The Eye of Judgment. For the most part now he is trying to establish a genre called “Virtual Concept.”

    Virtual Concept works much like video game and animation concept design but without a video game nor animation to speak of. He creates characters, develops worlds, and then repeats, slowly developing an entire universe. It is a process that is enhanced by viewers interaction and has led Toshinho to spend much of his time researching design and historical clothing. He has called the project “BOSS CONCEPT.”

    I actually stumbled on Toshinho’s artwork when his Red Sonja pin-up stopped me in my tracks. Toshinho’s supplied the linework and Pedro Figue added a background and really brought it to life with colour. A collaboration that, I am sure, many would love to see more of.

    Toshinho is both a traditional and digital artist. When working digitally, he seems to favour PaintTool SAI over the more popular Photoshop. Though, he does use Photoshop, as well as Clip Studio Paint. You can watch him work in real-time on Twitch. Those who become a Toshinho patreon are privy to all of his BOSS CONCEPT development, art tips, process videos and hi-res artwork. The BOSS CONCEPT project is a very interesting approach and I am very curious to see how it develops.

    You can keep up with Toshinho via his Tumblr and Twitter.

  4. Manga Mondays ~ Kato Miki

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    Following last week’s Manga Monday, there was another illustrator featured in the Ephemeral ~ Territory of Girls exhibition that really caught my eye, Kato Miki.

    Born in Saitama, Japan. Miki studied BA Painting at Joshibi University of Art and Design. Joshibi has a rather interesting history. Founded in 1900, it is a Women’s art school and the oldest private art school in Japan. The two founders opened it as a reaction to other art schools whom were denying women membership.

    After Miki graduated in 1996, she worked for two years before deciding to become a freelancer. She has kept busy working on mangas, children’s books and book covers, among other projects. She has also regularly exhibited at solo shows throughout Tokyo, Japan. Her work is largely influenced by the tradition-inspired Nihonga style. Artist such as Tsuchida Bakusen, Kiyokata Kaburagi, and Jakuchu Ito. Miki has also cited European artist Paul Delvaux and Alphonse Mucha also as major influences.

    You can find more of Kato Miki’s paintings on her website.

  5. Manga Mondays ~ Yusuke Murata

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    Yusuke Murata was born in Miyagi, Japan, 1978. Known primarily as a manga artist, Murata got a taste of the creative industry at a young age. Aged twelve he entered a competition to design Mega Man villains. Which he won, twice. Two of his design were adapted for the games, and he is credited for Dust Man in Mega Man 4 and Crystal Man in Mega Man 5.

    A little older, Murata had the very fortunate opportunity of being mentored by Obata Takeshi. At which time Murata was also illustrating for a number of one-shots published in Weekly Shonen Jump. Most notably his work for Eyeshield 21, a collaboration with writer Riichiro Inagaki. Originally a two-part one-shot it became serialized starting in 2002 and concluding in 2009. The 333 chapters, were collected and published into 37 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha, and later licensed for an English-language release by Viz Media. Eyeshield 21 has sold over 20 million volumes in Japan alone.

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  6. Manga Mondays ~ Ilya Kuvshinov

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    Ilya Kuvshinov is an illustrator and storyboard artist originally from Moscow, Russia, but whom currently resides in Yokohama, Japan. Much of his personal work consists of pin-ups influenced by video games and film. Beautifully and sensitively rendered, Kuvshinov is able to paint alluring female characters without the need to sexualise them (for the most part).

    His artwork has amassed a large and loyal fanbase which is evident when looking at his Patreon page. Currently, 827 patrons are supporting Kuvshinov with a healthy $3,821.36 per week. Allow me to pick up my jaw before I continue.

    Kuvshinov also posts process videos and animations to his YouTube and Vimeo channels. A few months ago he posted a wonderful fan letter in the form of an animation for his favorite manga Sing Yesterday for Me, which you can watch here.

    Find more of Ilya Kuvshinov’s work on his DeviantArt page and keep up-to-date with him on Facebook.

  7. Manga Mondays ~ Kazusa Takashima

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    Born in Hokkaido, Japan, Kazusa Takashima is most known for her yaoi manga. She started self-publishing her work in 1999, but in 2001 her manga Mad Love Chase (aka Harlem Beat wa Yoake Made) was serialization in Japanse magazine Asuka. After the well received debut Takashima went on to produce Last Client and Wild Rock.

    Takashima’s illustrations use very thin uniform lineweight. Her character-centric work ranges from very energetic to sombre. Her yaoi manga, in particular, features very erotic scenes which Takashima’s prefers to focus on intimacy over explicitness.

    You can find more of Kazusa Takashima’s work on her (somewhat outdated) website as well as checking out some of her mangas.