Tagged

germany

  1. Jana Schirmer

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    Jana Schirmer is a freelance artist currently based in Berlin, Germany. She was inspired to pick up a pencil at a young age after watching the Sailor Moon anime. Though her work does occasionally exhibit an affection for anime and manga, the bulk of it is very much grounded in realism. Schirmer’s portfolio is filled with still-life studies and portraiture. Observing the real-world, honing traditional skills, in order to make her fantasy artwork more convincing.

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  2. Fashion Fridays ~ Gerd Grimm (1911 – 1998)

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    Gerd Grimm was born 1911 in Karlsruhe, Germany. In 1929 he began his studies at The State Academy of Fine Arts Karlsruhe under the tutelage of German painters Wilhelm Schnarrenberger and Karl Hubbuch, and later attended The Academy of Fine Arts Nuremberg. In 1933 he moved to Berlin continuing his art studies at Berlin University of the Arts. Graphic designer, Oskar Hermann Werner Hadank, was his professor was among others. It was also here that Grimm met his met his partner and future wife, Hilde van Gülick.

    Grimm finished his studies around the same time Nazis were gaining power. He started a promising career in illustration, receiving commissions for covers of prominent fashion magazines such as Silberspiegel, Die Dame and Elegante Welt. He also provided artwork for cigarette brands Muratti Ariston, Reemtsmas Ova, and sparkling wine, Kupferberg. However, by 1935, with the introduction of The Nuremberg Laws, Grimm was labelled a “Half-Jew.” Aware of his dwindling career opportunities in Germany, he decided to move to Le Havre, Paris.

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  3. Andreas Deja

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    Andreas Deja is an animator and the genius behind some of your favourite Disney villains. Born 1957, in Gdansk, Poland, he and his family moved to Dinslaken, Germany, in 1958. When he was eleven years old he watched Disney’s Jungle Book for the first time. Its impact was instant and everlasting, right after seeing the movie, Deja was inspired to become an animator. Around the age of fourteen he began to attend life drawing classes and frequently go to the zoo to study the animals and their movement. Following a short stint in the army, he spent three years studying graphic design at the Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen, Germany.

    Deja began a correspondence with one of the Disney’s “Nine Old Men,” Eric Larson. Larson was heading up the Disney training program and during a visit to Germany, the two met. Larson was impressed with Deja’s portfolio and accepted him onto the training program. In 1980, Deja moved to Los Angeles and started training at the Disney studio.

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  4. Christoph Niemann

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    Christoph Niemann is an award-winning illustrator, artist, and author. Born in Waiblingen, Germany in 1970, he studied Graphic Design at the State Academy of Fine Art in Stuttgart, between 1991 and 1997. After completing his studies, Niemann moved to New York and began his career as an illustrator.

    In 2010 he was bestowed the honor of being inducted into the Art Directors Club Hall Of Fame. The only club that can boast Paul Rand, Saul Bass, Milton Glaser, Andy Warhol and Jim Henson as members.

    So, how did Christoph Niemann get his name included among such greats in less than 15 years?

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  5. Laura Müller

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    Laura Müller aka Laumii is a comic artist and illustrator from Berlin, Germany. She has contributed to Undo’s Mega Man Tribute, and Subway to Sally Storybook. Ms Müller is the artist of Nenetl of the Forgotten Spirits. Written by Vera Greentea, the first two volumes were funded by Kickstarter and the third volume is live on Kickstarter now.

    The vibrant and very cute illustrations of Laura Müller have a very lively quality to them. Though her style tends to lean towards manga, a western animation influence is very visible. Mr Müller has a varied colouring technique, all very strong, but I think her watercolours and her digital paintings are perticularly pleasing.

    You can find more of Laura Müller’s work on DeviantArt and tumblr.

  6. Wilhelm M. Busch (1908 – 1987)

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    William Martin Busch was born in Breslau, Germany. His father was a painter and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw. During Mr. Busch’s professional life he jumped from decorative painter to press illustrator, freelancing as artist, then sharing his wisdom as a teacher. Not least, amidst it all, illustrating over 300 books. Duly earning recognition and the distinguished Edwin Scharff Prize.

    Mr. Busch’s style ranges from meticulous and realistic renders, to loose and speedy sketches. Of which his entire gamut is equally enchanting. Personally, I am besotted by Mr. Busch’s more relaxed linework. He could capture the essence and gesture of a moment at a level that is rarely achieved.

    There are a couple of great websites that feature a ton of Wilhelm M. Busch’s work, head to Hans Bacher’s blog and Deja View.

  7. Sheree Domingo

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    Sheree is currently studying Illustration and Comic Art at the Achool of Art and Design Kassel, Germany. Her blog has a huge amount of work, especially comics. I love her alternative ‘indie’ style, which is quite abstract and loose. I really hope to see her work in my favourite comic shop, Gosh in London, one day soon. She seems the sort to be unconstrained by our ‘set rules’ of how to create comics, and I believe it’s people like her who will break the mould and do incredibly exciting things with the medium.