Tagged: french
  1. 27

    Nov 2015

    Fashion Fridays ~ Pierre Mourgue (1890 – 1969)

    pierre-mourgue-01 pierre-mourgue-02 pierre-mourgue-03 pierre-mourgue-04 pierre-mourgue-05 pierre-mourgue-06

    Pierre Mourgue was born in France, 1890. He was a regular contributor to the premiere French fashion magazine, La Gazette du Bon Ton. As such, the influential magazine was picked up by publishers, Condé Nast, who distributed it across American under the name, Gazette du Bon Genre. The magazine’s artwork was comprised of many talented French illustrators, including Paul Iribe, Pierre Brissaud, Georges Lepape. Condé Montrose Nast enlisted all of the La Gazette du Bon Ton artist for another one of his magazines, Vogue.

    Pierre Mourgue was based in Paris but made frequent trips to New York, as such, his illustrations were regularly on and inside the covers of Vogue magazine. His ink and gouache illustrations brought a Parisian flair to the American edition.

    Mourgue’s style updated with art movements. A lot of his early work has a strong Art Deco influence, with his 1940s and 1950s work resembling the American advertising illustrations that we regularly associate with that era. His illustrations often get compared to Pierre Brissaud’s, for their use of exaggerated figures and their disposition for pretty girl.

    Mourgue illustrated for fashion designers Nina Ricci, Christian Dior, and Marcel Rochas. Bringing their garments to life with his careful observation, and ability to infuse a sense of fun and coolness.

    You can see a large collection of Pierre Mourgue’s illustrations over at Hprints.

  2. 22

    Oct 2015

    René Vincent (1879–1936)

    rene-vincent-01 rene-vincent-02 rene-vincent-03 rene-vincent-04 rene-vincent-05 rene-vincent-06

    René Vincent was a French illustrator, painter and poster designer. Prevalent in the 1920s-1930s, he worked in the popular Art Deco style. His illustrations helped define early 20th-century advertising, birthing countless imitators and admirers alike. Tintin creator, Hergé, cited René Vincent as an inspiration.

    Vincent was born in Bordeaux, France in 1879, but moved to the capital when he was five-years-old. His father, Charles Vincent was a famous novelist and his older brother Henri Vincent-Anglade was a renowned painter.

    Vicent enrolled in the prestigious Ècole des Beaux-Arts to study architecture. It was during this time he began to illustrate for books to earn some extra money. Discovering his aptitude for illustration, he decided to change to the graphic arts and ceramics courses.

    He created perfect worlds with glamour fashionistas in luxury settings, partaking in jolly pastimes. His characters were vibrant and confident. Which in turn attracted many fashion and lifestyle periodicals such as La Vie Parisienne, Femina, Le Rire, and Fantasio. Interestingly, he went under a few pseudonyms, Rene Mael, Rageot and Dufour, allowing him to change style freely.

    Vicent’s success granted him an opportunity to visit the United States, where he did some work for esteemed magazines Saturday Evening and Harper’s Bazaar. When he arrived back in France, he set up his own studio in Paris. He began illustrating advertisements for Bugatti, Peugeot, Michelin, and Shell Oil.

    As a keen automobilist, Vicent was one of the first French citizen to have a driver’s license. Additionally he built a garage onto his house, to park his Bugatti. In the 20s owning a car was a symbol of success. As mentioned, Vicent’s character quite obviously belonged to this sort of wealthier social class. Thus the work suited Vicent remarkably well, and as such he produced stunning vehicle illustration that raised the bar. Furthermore, the women of these advertisements had androgynous styles, short hair, they were sassy and emancipated. He unknowingly defined the look of automotive women for years to come.

    Towards the end on the 20s, largely due to the Great Depression, the luxury lifestyle was advertised less and purposely made more discreet. It halted the momentum that the creative and craft industry had built up and subsequently went into a decline. Another result was the increased use of photography over illustration, a repercussion which is felt to this day. Vicent died in 1936 at the age of 57. He left behind him pioneering achievements in the field of automotive advertising and a body of work that continues to inspire artist today.

  3. 25

    Sep 2015

    Fashion Fridays ~ Noumeda Carbone

    Noumeda-Carbone-01 Noumeda-Carbone-02 Noumeda-Carbone-03 Noumeda-Carbone-04 Noumeda-Carbone-05 Noumeda-Carbone-06

    Noumeda Carbone is an award winning illustrator based in Florence, Italy. Freelancing since 2006 she has worked with a host of clients including Leo Burnett, Vogue, Saatchi & Saatchi and The Guardian. Carbone’s detailed and surreal work has graced the walls of multiple solo and group exhibition and illuminated the pages of many magazines like Rolling Stone, Glamour, Computer Arts, La Perla Magazine, and Juxtapoz.

    Carbone’s illustrations balance the fanciful with the forlorn. Finicky detail sit next to fancy-free water colour brush work. All the elements are collated digitally to give a coherent, layered and dazzling finished piece.

    You can gaze at more of Noumeda Carbone’s work on her website and instagram.

  4. 21

    Aug 2015

    Fashion Fridays ~ Ënnji

    ennji-06 ennji-04 ennji-01 ennji-02 ennji-03 ennji-05

    Ënnji is French illustrator represented by both Karine Garnier and illozoo. She creates stripped-down illustrations focusing on basic shapes and limited colours. Occasionally adding in textures such as watercolour or ink splats. Roughing up otherwise pristine shape adding some movement. Ënnji’s illustrations play on negative space. She regularly balances visible shapes with ones that are purposely obscured, compelling the viewer complete the image themselves.

    You can find more of Ënnji’s work on her website and tumblr.

  5. 19

    Jan 2015

    Manga Mondays ~ Nicolas Nemiri

    nicolas-nemiri-01 nicolas-nemiri-02 nicolas-nemiri-03 nicolas-nemiri-04 nicolas-nemiri-05 nicolas-nemiri-06

    Nicolas Nemiri was born 1975 in Mulhouse, France. He studied at the Ecole Européenne Supérieure de l’Image in Angoulême. After graduating and moving to Japan, at the age of 20 he was making money by doing odd jobs, including illustrating for Japanese fashion magazines.

    In 1998 writer Jean David Morvan saw some of Nemiri’s drawings and asked him to work on the comic series Reality show. Nemiri was enthusiastic but decided to turn down Morvan’s offer. However, he later accepted the offer to work on the futuristic series Je suis morte (I died), published by Glénat. This successful collaboration marked the beginning of a long working relationship with Morvan. Creating two more series, Hyper l’hippo (2005) and Annie Zoo (2009).

    Nemiri has stated some of his artistic influences include European artist Jean Giraud (Moebius), Hugo Pratt and André Franquin as well as Japanese artist Katsuhiro Otomo, Hiroaki Samura, Shou Tajima. All of whom you can be seen elements of across his portfolio.

    Nicolas Nemiri is currently exhibiting alongside illustrator Jean-Philippe Kalonji at the Galerie Glenat in Paris. It is running throughout January until the 31st.

    You can see more of Nemiri’s work on his tumblr and blogspot.

Back to Top