Tagged: american
  1. 3

    Feb 2015

    Robbi Rodriguez

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    With the release of the anticipated Marvel title Spider-Gwen nearly upon us, I thought now was a great time to feature American Designer and Cartoonist, Robbi Rodriguez.

    With just over a decade of making comics, Rodriguez in that time has worked on a host of great titles including his creator-own title Frankie, get your gun, Vertigo’s FBP: Federal Bureau of Physics, Image’s Night Club, 24seven (Vol.2), Hazed and Oni Press titles Tek Jansen, Maintenance and Polly and the Pirates (Vol.2).

    Speaking of Polly and the Pirates, I was deeply disappointed to read all the negative comments it has on Amazon. Mostly from readers who preferred the author and original artist, Ted Naifeh’s style. With all respect to Naifeh, these commenters don’t know what they are talking about. I realise that Rodriguez’s work by no means needs defending, but I can not help but put these comments in their place. Yes, art will always be subjective, but Rodriguez brought more energy and better-developed characters to the book. Which, for a swash-buckling pirate book, can only be a good thing.

    Interestingly, comparing his artwork from Polly to his recent work with Marvel, really showcases his versatility. Looking at the pages of Polly, you can see a strong European influence in his work, especially from the likes of Pierre Alary and Denis Bodart. His Marvel work has a rougher more edgy feel to it, in a similar vain to artist like Paul Pope and Jeff Stokely. Then there is his personal work where he really goes to town and experiments with his style, medium, and incorporating more graphic design elements.

    Check out more of Robbi Rodriguez’s work on his website and DeviantArt page. Also don’t forget to pick up a copy of Spider-Gwen #1 when it hits the comic stands on February 25th.

  2. 28

    Jan 2015

    Amanda Winterstein

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    Presenting the beautiful background art of Amanda Winterstein. A graduate of California Institute of the Arts, more informal known as CalArts. She cut her teeth at animation studio Divide Nine before going on to become a designer for late-night Fox animated series Friends Night ADHD. Winterstein has now found a home at Cartoon Network working as a background painter on their popular series Steven Universe.

    Winterstein’s work for both Steven Universe and much of her previous work use soft pastel tones to great effect. Harmonising colours to create relaxed airy environments. Her paintings often mimic watercolours which help add to their calming appeal.

    Pop over to Amanda Winterstein’s tumblr to see more Steven Universe backgrounds and more of her personal artwork.

  3. 21

    Jan 2015

    Greg Wright

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    Greg Wright is a Philadelphia-based freelance illustrator. A University of the Arts graduate, Wright is the head designer, as well as a contributor, for the t-shirt company, InksterInc. Wright’s work utilises a restrained pallet, often without any shading. His simplified shapes and limited details makes his illustrations ideal for pretty much any product he chooses to put them on. All of which combines to make his Society6 shop off-limits for me, and only fit for those who have some self-control, or deep pockets.

    You can find more of Greg Wright’s illustrations on his website and tumblr.

  4. 22

    Sep 2014

    Book Review ~ The Art of John Alvin

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    Editor’s Note:

    John Alvin was an American movie artist who painted movie poster art for over 130 films, including E.T., Blade Runner, The Lion King, The Princess Bride and Jurassic Park, as well as the Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and Pirates of the Caribbean film series. He also produced work for Disney Fine Art (Disney character official portraits).

    The Book Review:

    I have been going afoot with The Art of John Alvin under my arm for about a week now, and I have been stopped by people who recognize the E.T. image. Once I say, “yes, it’s the art of John Alvin”, they just stare back at me blankly.

    The book’s first line of introduction surmises, rather well, the career and work of John Alvin:

    “Hollywood’s best kept secret”

    No doubt reading through the list of films in the editors note you had a vivid image of each of the movie posters mentioned. John Alvin’s artwork is entwined with movie history, with many of his poster just as memorable as the films themselves.

    Reading through the book you get a real sense of what Mr Alvin built, and what boundaries he broke. Way before photo compositions were common place, he was achieving them using friskets made from transparent paper. There is a nice quote right at the end of the book that perfectly sums up Mr Alvin’s work ethic and his keenness for innovation, written by Farah Alvin (John’s daughter), she says:

    “If there was no tool to make something happen, he’d make it himself”

    One of the things I really appreciated about this book is that 30+ plus posters have at least two dedicated pages each. The first page of each poster explains the clients requirements, any possible problem, and the solution. It is a real treat to have this amount of insight. It also helps you admire the work, that little bit more, knowing the restrictions faced.

    Another interesting tidbit I found out from reading the book was that John Alvin was allowed to sign a few of his movie posters. I bet you have never spotted the small “Alvin” hidden in his posters despite probably staring at them hundreds of times. I naturally then spent the following hour carefully looking for his signature in many of his posters. If like me, you now have time and that uncontrollable urge to satisfy, you can start with the Blade Runner poster.

    I get the feeling Mr Alvin was quite content contributing to such a prodigious industry from in the adumbrate walls of his studio. However, it is somewhat a shame an artist like John Alvin with work so recognizable to have his name be virtually unknown. Thankfully The Art of John Alvin aims to remedy this, with a beautiful collection of work, cementing his name to the art for moviegoers and illustrators alike.

    Small sidenote: It is particularly enjoyable if you were a child of the 80s and 90s when whilst reading the book you suddenly realize that John Alvin is responsible for a great deal of your moviegoing joy.

    The Art of John Alvin
    Titan Books
    Hardcover
    160 pages
    31.5 x 23.1 x 2 cm
  5. 18

    Sep 2014

    Lydia Nichols

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    Philadelphia-based Lydia Nichols is a illustrator, typographer, designer, and teacher (and anthropomorphizer). After an intern at Pixar, Ms Nichols started freelancing. Some of her notable clients including Bloomberg Businessweek, Chronicle Books, Google UK and MailChimp. She has also taught at MICA and Moore, as well a providing a class for Skillshare.

    Squeezing the best out of illustrator and photoshop, Ms Nichols’ work is both lucid and tactile. Her illustrations are clear, sprightly and guaranteed to put a smile on your face, if not, just a simper. Child-friendly too, her illustrations use subdued colour and have a Mary Blair/UPA charm to them.

    See more of Lydia Nichols’ on her website and Dribbble page.

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