Tagged: american
  1. 19

    Aug 2014

    Cleon Peterson

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    Cleon Peterson is an LA based artist. His stark paintings depict a constant chaotic power struggle between a broods of grotesque figures. In a bitter irony his dystopian landscapes have law breakers and law enforcers on equal footing, putting personal entitlement above morals.

    Mr Peterson’s work has been exhibited across America, Europe and Australia. His art is regularly featured in magazines, it graces walls, and the cover of Philip K Dick’s novel, The Man in the High Castle.

    You can see more of Mr Peterson’s artwork on his website. Yes, it is violent and on the unsettling side, you have been warned.

  2. 30

    Jul 2014

    Matthew Woodson

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    Matthew Woodson is an American illustrator whom I have admired for some time. His illustrations are not just beautiful, they are poetic. Mr Woodson graduated from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 2006, landing a job straight away, and has been freelancing ever since.

    Though predominately keeping busy with editorial work, Mr Woodson has worked with a variety of clients and projects. Some of his notable clients include American Express, Dazed & Confused Magazine, ESPN, Mondo Posters, The New York Times, Randomhouse Publishing, Royal Mail, Vogue, and the list goes on.

    If you have a penchant for the more verbose illustrator, you will definitely enjoy his blog, where he often gives a some background to his work and some insight to his process. You can also check out more of Mr Woodson’s work on his website.

  3. 15

    Jul 2014

    Mary Lundquist

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    Mary Lundquist is an illustrator based in Los Angeles. She graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and is currently working on several children’s books. I assume, one at least, will be based on her character Bunny, whom can be spotted throughout her portfolio. Mrs Lundquist’s style utilise her soft pencil work by adding a simple wash of watercolours, giving her illustrations a real tranquil feeling.

    You can see more of Mary Lundquist’s work on her website.

    A quick thanks goes to our avid Lounge reader, Nicholas, whom bought Mrs Lundquist’ work to our attention. If you have a personal project, or have seen inspiring illustrator you want to shout about, you can email your suggestions to us via our contact page.

  4. 3

    Jul 2014

    Jon Contino

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    Jon Contino is an artist I have admired for a while. From New York, and influenced by New York, his style is instantly recognisable. Much of Mr Contino’s work revolves around typography. Combining traditional techniques with digital tools he has bridged the gap between traditional and modern.

    Mr Contino’s work is not the case of making something new look old, it is quite the opposite, taking the lost art of hand-drawn lettering and making it relevant in today’s market. He does it so well that he has become one of the most sought after designers. So much so it would probably be quicker to list all the clients and company he hasn’t worked with. But to give you an idea of how long his client list here are but a few:

    20th Century Fox, AIGA, AT&T, American Express, Coca-Cola, ESPN, Ford, Harley Davidson, Harper Collins, IBM, Jack Daniel’s, Jameson Whiskey, Kellogg’s, Random House, The Washington Post, Dockers, H&M, JCPenney, Lacoste, New Balance, Nike, Obey Clothing, and Victoria’s Secret.

    Not keeping busy enough producing client work, Mr Contino somehow found time to set up his own menswear’s company, Contino Brand and Co-Found CXXVI Clothing Company.

    To keep up-to-date with Jon Contino’s work, check out his website and follow him on twitter.

  5. 27

    May 2014

    Johnny Craig (1926 – 2001)

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    John Thomas Alexis Craig (also known pseudonymously as Jay Taycee and F. C. Aljohn) was an American comic book artist. Talented as both an illustrator and a writer he was posthumously inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 2005.

    Johnny Craig was a very active part of many EC Comics’ best-selling horror titles including, Tales from the Crypt and The Haunt of Fear. Impeccably pencilled and inked, his clear and uncluttered style gave his stories the type of suspense found in a Hitchcock film.

    For those of you acquainted with comic book history, you may already recognise his work. During the whole Seduction of the Innocent debacle. At the Senate hearings on juvenile delinquency Mr. Craig’s Crime SuspenStories #22 cover was exhibited by the prosecution. The cover, which depicts an axe-wielding man holding a woman’s severed head, was presented and question whether it was “in good taste”. Which EC publisher Bill Gaines obtusely responded, “Yes, sir, I do, for the cover of a horror comic”.

    The uproar surrounding Seduction of the Innocent and outcome of hearing led to the creation of the Comic Code Authority, which subsequently resulted in EC’s horror titles folding. Bitter irony but not all bad, Mr. Craig continued to work briefly in horror comics and later went on to do several jobs for Marvel and DC.

    A good place to see more of Johnny Craig work is in the EC Archives, specifically Vault Of Horror and Tales From The Crypt.

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