Tagged: american
  1. 30

    Jun 2015

    Jordie Bellaire

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    If there is a comic on the shelf right now not coloured by Jordie Bellaire, I have not seen it. This weekend, during a quick comic shop, I saw her name on Moon Knight, Convergence Shazam, The Kitchen, Injection and probably a bunch more I did not spot. Jordie Bellaire has been a familiar fixture of our comic shop shelves for much of the last two years. So prolific and wonderful is Ballaire, that last year the industry showed their appriciation in the form of an Eisner award. Which in 22 years only 10 other colourist have earned, Dave Stewart and Chris Ware claiming over half of the awards between them.

    Bellaire has worked with close to all of the big comic publisher on many great titles such as, Pretty Deadly, The Manhattan Projects, Nowhere Men, Zero, and Hawkeye. Along the way, enhansing the pages of many of my favourite current comic artist including Tom Fowler, Chris Samnee, Ramon Perez, Sean Murphy, Becky Cloonan and Emma Rios.

    Perhaps you have heard of Colorist Appreciation Day, well, you can thank Bellaire for that too!

    I started collecting comics in a bygone time called the 90s. Back then there was one stamp on the covers of comic far more important than the Comic Code Authority, which was Liquid!. Many of my favourite titles had it and thanks to their distinct logo, one could not miss it. It was the first time I took a real interest in colourist and that apprieciation has grown ever since. I thought at the time this was a shared feeling, however, jump forward 20 years and it seems like the industy and perhaps its audience have not shown colourist the same recognition. In a tumblr post by titled, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it any more” directed at an unnamed fan convention, Bellaire laid it out bare, stating the importanace of all professionals that work in comics, underlining the vital role that colourist play. The post gained the attention that the subject deserved and resulted in fans calling for a #ColoristAppreciationDay on Twitter and opened a discussion that continues today.

    To see more of Jordie Bellaire’s work, simply go to your comic shop and pick a comic up from the shelf, chances are she coloured it. You can also check out her tumblr and twitter.

  2. 21

    May 2015

    Julie Dillon

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    Two-time Hugo Award and Chesley Award Winner, Julie Dillon is a freelance artist from Northern California. In 2005 she graduated with a BFA in Fine Arts from Sacramento State University. Then a year later she had begun working as a freelance artist professionally. Specialising in sci-fi and fantasy art, Dillon has created artwork for trading cards, book covers, magazines, and even perfume labels. Clients including Simon & Schuster, Tor Books, and Penguin Books.

    Dillon’s illustrations are rich in colours with enchanting lighting. Warm glows illuminate her figures and environments. Her compositions too are equally compelling. Even though she works in a realistic style, she is unafraid to play with the laws of physics to produce more dynamic images.

    Julie Dillon has run two very successful Kickstarter campaigns for a series of annual art books, titled Imagined Realms. If you missed the campaign and wish you could get your hands on a copy, you are in luck! You can pick up a hard copy of Book 1 from her shop, and a digital copy from her gumroad.

  3. 12

    May 2015

    Dave Valeza

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    A Savannah, Georgia local, Dave Valeza graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design with a masters in Sequential Art. He worked as a visual development and layouts artist on the touching graphic novel An Elegy for Amelia Johnson, written by Andrew Rostan and illustrated by Kate Kasenow. Valeza has also contributed to comics Love Machines and Anything That Loves Anthology.

    I was first attracted to his work via his Tumblr, where he posts up daily observational drawings. Usually sat in a coffee shop, Valeza produces quick brush pen sketches of people, capturing their personality and style with limited strokes. Then in turn includes his observations into his comics, adding the small details that bring his characters to life.

    You can find more of Dave Valeza’s work on his website.

  4. 7

    May 2015

    Brave the Woods

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    Brave the Woods is a design and illustration studio based in Texas, comprised of duo Brad & Krystal Woodard. They create retro inspired illustrations with strong graphic design sensibilities. Some of their clients include Target, Old Navy, Honda, Urban Outfitters, Microsoft, and the History Channel.

    Their styles vary per project, drawing inspiration from a range of sources and experiences. Though, looking across their portfolio, I can see the influence of UPA in their character design and a touch of Alexander Girard in their graphic design. The typography is also a key element of their work. Always in keeping with the overall piece, their type is playful and fun without compromising the clarity.

    Brave the Woods also have a shop called Brave Outpost. It is jam-packed with goodies from Books to T-Shirts. With great prices too, it is definitely worth perusing.

  5. 31

    Mar 2015

    Michelle Woodward

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    Michelle Woodward is a Sheridan College graduate born and raised in Southern Ontario. She works as a freelance illustrator with clients including Creative Quarterly, McGraw-HIll Ryerson, Canadian Running Magazine, and Dirt Rag Magazine. Many of Woodward’s illustrations have a feeling of trepidation or unease, which she creates with great use of desaturated tones and lone figures.

    You can find more of Michelle Woodward’s work on her website and Society6.

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