Tagged: 3DTotal
  1. 9

    Dec 2014

    Book Review ~ 3DTotal’s Sketch Workshop

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    When 3DTotal offered the Illustrator’s Lounge an opportunity to review their Sketch Workshop series I jumped at the chance. I first heard about it through their exceedingly successful Kickstarter campaign. My intrigued was peaked, how would they tackle explaining some rather complex and layered subject matters to a novice?

    Expecting to receive one or two of the workbooks, when I opened the parcel to find the entire Sketch Workshop bundle, there was a genuine gasp of joy. It included the leather-style folder, all five workbooks, and a set of drawl-inducing drawing tools, including five Koh-I-Noor graphite pencils. It is a very attractive set, which I sat staring at for a while, before it suddenly dawned on me that I may need some help if I planned on doing a review of this set any justice.

    I decided to recruit the help of my 8-year-old cousin, (appropriately named) Arty. Definitely younger than the demographic that these workbooks are aimed for, but I was interested to see how accessible the tutorials are. I know that Arty already has an interest in illustration and has an attention span that could rival mine. So I knew it would not be too laborious to ask him to sit down for an hour or so and work through some of the pages with me.

    I thought that Robot & Spaceships and Creatures workbooks would be best, as I know that Arty has a love of cars, and as you can’t really draw “creatures” wrong, can you? When I arrived workbooks in hand and told Arty that today we will be drawing together, he got really excited. When I pulled out the stationary he got even more excited, which is an indication of a future artist if there ever was one.

    Given the choice of the two workbooks, Arty decided to go for Creatures. So I opened it up to a tutorial which looked the simplest. I showed him the page and explained what we would be drawing, then I read all the instructions to him, to which he responded “Wow, that’s hard”. I laughed and then tried to simplify the instructions a bit for him. He chose his pencils and got started.

    Interestingly I had already given the Anatomy workbook a go a few days earlier, and my initial reaction was very similar to Arty’s. I am a competent illustrator and there was not anything in the Anatomy workbook that I would particularly struggle drawing, but yet I found some of the tutorials intimidating. A combination of a beautifully rendered sketch accompanied with instructions that neglected to explain the basics just threw me off. All workbooks have multiple tutors, so this scenario is not case for all tasks, but it is a common theme across the workbooks.

    An example that came up when drawing with Arty was that he did not understanding the 3D aspect of the jaw and stuck to drawing the front row of teeth. I sketched a cylinder to help explain how he should think of a jaw and he quickly understood adapted his drawing to show back teeth. After an hour of drawing, Arty had filled a couple pages of A4 paper with a few pretty impressive creature teeth and dinosaur eyes. That was sadly as far as his attention span went. He then proceeded to shape the putty rubber into a rocket and throw it around the room. However, working alongside Arty’s helped me better gauge whom these workbooks are best suited to.

    It is sadly a tad advanced for an 8-year-old (specifically Arty). I felt the tutorials were a bit too specific for my own needs, but I will probably give Robots & Spaceships and Cityscapes another go, as I have always found this area of technical drawing difficult. So ruling out the novice and the seasoned illustrator (ahem) I would say that these books best suit intermediate artist, those who have a good grasps of the basics, understand construction well, and have just starting to push their art into a direction.

    Which brings me to the strength of the Sketch Workshop. It does a great job of encouraging the artist to really think. If you are drawing a creature, is it dangerous? If so where will their jaw hinge? If it is a robot, what fuel does it use? After you have really thought about the physicality of the drawing you are asked to consider lighting, so that you can render your drawing as realistic as possible too. These are definitely areas which can get left behind when learning to draw, so there is obvious merit in their approach.

    All in all, if I had the Sketch Workshop when I was in Secondary School it would likely be one of my most prized possessions. It is beautifully presented and impossible not to get excited about. I will surely be wrapping the bundle up and gifting it to Arty for Christmas, and just like a Christmas jumper, hope he grows into it.

    Try Sketch Workshops for FREE!

    3DTotal is currently giving away a free sample chapter of the Robots & Spaceships Sketch Workshop on their site. Check it out here.

    Sketch Workshop Bundle
    3DTotal Publishing
    Includes:
    The Sketch Workshop leather-style folder
    5 Workbooks (Anatomy, Characters, Creatures, Robots & Spaceships, Cityscapes)
    A set of drawing tools (graphite pencils, sketching pens, a putty rubber and dual pencil sharpener)
  2. 28

    Nov 2014

    Book Review ~ Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy

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    Editors Note:

    In Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy, 50 talented traditional and digital artists have been chosen to share their sketchbook works. Ranging from Hollywood film concept designers to talented students, each artist is handpicked from a vibrant international online art community. From doodles and sketches of creative creatures to fully rendered drawings of invented worlds, this book explores how 50 artists develop their ideas to create incredible images.

    The Book Review:

    A follow up to Sketching from the Imagination, Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy is a chunky square size paperback that showcases a plethora of illustrators. Many of whom I was being introduced to for the first time. Like many artist, I love flicking through other people’s sketchbooks. There is an element of freedom and expression in an artist sketchbook that rarely translate into their commercial work which make them so captivating.

    Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy has around 6 pages per illustrator and cherry picks drawings from each of their sketchbooks. In this regard it does not quite feel like thumbing through their personal sketchbook pages, warts and all. It is more flaunting how beautiful and creative a sketch can be. Each illustrator has a short description about themselves and their work. They also talk about their inspirations, techniques and materials. I particularly enjoyed reading the variety of materials the illustrators use, which it should satisfy any of us with a stationery fetish. Interestingly, and perhaps slightly fruitless, a large amount of the features claim to use only a HB pencil.

    As mentioned in the editor’s note, there are 50 feature illustrators, all unique in style. There were a few illustrators whom I feel are of particular note, such as Wylie Beckert, George Guo, Paul Sullivan, and Sean Andrew Murray.As well as Adonna Khare and Jim Pavelec who show off some marvellous fully rendered work that can quite easily be the finished article.

    Overall Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy is enjoyable to flick through introducing a host of artist whose styles should satisfies all tastes. I found it especially useful reading the insight from the individual illustrators. The vital upshot that comes from reading the book is it raising the bar of your own sketchbook, with many of the illustrators setting a rather high benchmark to follow.

    Sketching from the Imagination: Fantasy
    3DTotal Publishing
    Paperback
    320 pages
    25 x 216 x 235mm
  3. 18

    Mar 2014

    Victor Hugo

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    Victor Hugo Queiroz is a 3D artist from Brazil. Winner of multiple awards including CGTalk Choice Award, 3DTotal Excelence Award, and CGHub Gold Award. Hugo currently works for Techno Image, along side previously featured artist, Pedro Conti.

    Self-taught, Hugo has developed a comical manga-influenced style for his personal work. His character’s have large luring eyes, and rubbery skin which further exaggerate their playfulness. I will leave you with a very good quote I read on Hugo’s Facebook page:

    “Everyone has something to learn, everyone has something to teach”

  4. 16

    Jul 2013

    Giveaway! Beginner’s Guide to Creating Manga Art

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    Continuing the jubilations of our newly reinvigorated website, we have a wonderful competition for all our dedicated Loungers. The kind folks at 3DTotal have supplied us with a copy of Beginner’s Guide to Creating Manga Art to give away!

    Book Description:

    Beginner’s Guide to Creating Manga Art explores the topic of manga art, starting from basic character design and progressing to full color images. Industry greats including Steven Cummings and Gonzalo Ordoñez open a window into their world and present tutorials covering everything from drawing features, anatomy and expressions to designing clothing, perfecting poses and coloring characters with a variety of traditional and digital artistic tools. Bursting with knowledge and brilliant artwork, Beginner’s Guide to Creating Manga Art is an unmissable title for anyone wanting to learn how to capture that classic manga style.

    For your chance to win a copy, you must simply do two things:

    1. Firstly you need to follow either our Facebook page or our Twitter (if you are not already following us).
    2. Secondly you MUST answer the following question by either pasting the your answer on our Facebook wall or on Twitter using our tag @the_loungers.

    Question:

    Which very famous anime recently celebrated it’s 25th Anniversary?

    All answers must be in before the 16th of August 2013. A winner will be selected at random and announced on the 17th of August 2013 and contacted via Facebook or Twitter.

    Good Luck!

  5. 12

    Jun 2013

    Book Review ~ Prime – The Definitive Digital Art Collection

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    Prime showcases the pinnacle of digital artistic achievement from around the globe in a definitive collection of 21st century CG artwork.

    This unique set of five books is housed in a single slipcase, with each book devoted to a classic gallery theme – sci-fi, character, cartoon, fantasy or scenes – and featuring stunning, world-class work that comes courtesy of some of the greatest artists in the industry.

    Never before has a collection of this magnitude been released. Prime brings together over 400 top-quality pieces in one easily accessible set of books, for your immediate viewing pleasure. Whatever your artistic tastes, the tantalizing mix of fantastical creatures, humorous caricatures, sweeping landscapes and fascinating characters on offer in Prime is guaranteed to capture your imagination and leave you with a timeless source of inspiration that you can return to again and again.

    The Book Review:

    First of all, I must note the substantial presentation of Prime. Five perfect-bound books snugly protected by a rather hefty glossy slipcase. Each book’s cover is adorned with a spot UV illustration, and the interiors are vibrantly printed on large glossy paper.

    Prime, as well as being a very attractive coffee table piece works very well as an introduction to world of digital illustration. It showcases illustrators from a broad range of styles and techniques. For the most part each artist only has one page, with the occasional few having two to three pages. Which is why I say it works well as an introduction, with so few images per illustrator, it definitely encourages you to seek out more about individual illustrators.

    Each image is titled, credited and names the software used. The predominant technique showcased across all five books is, unsurprisingly, digital painting. However, the editors do a good job of breaking this up with varying styles, including some breathtaking examples 3D rendering—mostly found in the Scenes book. There are also good examples of less rendered illustrations, almost completely flat colours, as well as more experimental and expressive painting techniques. On the whole I would say it caters better for those wanting to see great examples of realistic digital painting, but there are enough gems showcasing other techniques to keep any eclectic Lounger happy.

    If I had to choose a volume, I would say Cartoons is my probably my favourite. It is the one with the most varied styles, and the most light-hearted. A few of the illustrators that stood out (some in the slideshow above) were Reynan Sanchez, Yukari Masuike, Mateusz Lenart, Guillermo Soria, Morteza Najafi, Valentina Remenar, Sergio Diaz, Guillaume Ospital as well a couple illustrator’s we have previously featured on the Lounge Peter Oedekoven, and Max Kostenko. All illustrators featured across the books are top-notch; these are just some of the ones that appealed to my personal tastes.

    To find out more about Prime – The Definitive Digital Art Collection, and perhaps discover a new favourite illustrator, head over go to the 3DTotal website.

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