1. 11

    Nov 2013

    Leticia Reinaldo

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    Leticia Reinaldo aka lelatr is Brazil born, but currently living and working in LA. She is 3D Modeler and Texture Artist whom has a particular skill in creating atmosphere. Her character illustrations are beaming with life, so much so that you want to be friends with them! …or that could just be me. As well as producing assests for video games and commercials, Leticia Reinaldo has also had the chance to share her skills teaching at SAGA – School of Art.

    Check out Ms. Reinaldo’s demo reel and more of work on her website.

  2. 8

    Nov 2013

    Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright

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    Editor’s Note:

    David Wright was one of the leading pin-up artists of the 20th Century. Unlike his American contemporaries Alberto Vargas and Gil Elvgren, the British-born Wright brought a sense of realism to his willowy beauties, who appeared in publications on both sides of the Atlantic, especially during WW2. Now, finally, access has been granted to his archive, and this is the first ever collection of his work.

    The Book Review:

    Sirens opens up with a enjoyable forward from David’s son, Patrick. Speaking of the many hours his father spent in his studio, Patrick confesses to never really knowing what he did all day. From the introduction onwards, the author give a short history of David Wright, his career and the impact his work had at the time. Starting from page 18, the majority of the book is beautiful large full-page pin-ups.

    Looking through such a large body of work you start to see what sets David Wright’s work from some of his contemporaries. Many of his pieces do not have that “gloss” that a lot of the American pin-ups had. They feel a little sketchier, a little moodier. His women have all the glamour of the 1950s, but are presented with more depth. Most of his women seem withdrawn in their thoughts, many without a hint of a smile. A far cry from the happy-go-lucky pin-ups we are used to seeing. Past simply relying on scantily clad models to create eroticism, David Wright’s women are not just sat in their bedrooms smiling for the camera, their pensive demeanour is inviting you in. To this regard, Wright’s work remind me more of the sophisticated women of Robert McGinnis, than the idealized women of Gil Elvgren.

    If I were to have a gripe about the book, it would be that the image quality of the pictures vary. The majority of them are perfect, however, when you stumble on a few slightly lower quality ones it somewhat interrupts your experience. The other thing, which I know is just my personal taste, it would have been nice to see some more roughs or sketches.

    With that said, David Wright’s women truly are beautiful and Sirens is a decidedly bonny body of his work, with enough variety to keep you engaged, and in my case, wanting more. Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright is available to buy right now, and if you are a fan of Carol Day, pulp or pin-up this is definitely one for you.

    Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright
    Titan Books
    Hardback with dust jacket
    192 pages
    310 x 228mm
  3. 7

    Nov 2013

    Romain Mennetrier

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    Lush work from French freelance illustrator, Romain Mennetrier. His simplified shapes work wonderfully with his textured colour treatment. I particularly love how emotive and charming his characters are. You can find more of Mr. Mennetrier work on his blog, brutal moineau or maybe pick up one of his Society6 prints.

  4. 5

    Nov 2013

    Gene Luen Yang

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    Multiple Eisner award winner, writer/illustrator, Gene Luen Yang began his career self-publishing his comic books under the name Humble Comics in 1996. He went on to write and draw a host of books including Animal Crackers, Prime Baby, American Born Chinese. The latter was released by First Second Books in 2006 and became the first graphic novel to be nominated for a National Book Award and the first to win the American Library Association’s Printz Award.

    Mr. Yang is also the writer of Dark Horse’s comic series the Avatar: The Last Airbender. Very recently First Second Books released his two-volume graphic novel project, Boxers & Saints.

    Not long ago I watched a wonderful talk Gene Luen Yang gave at Penn State University, where he champions the comic medium, and discusses his thoughts and process behind some of his work. If you have a spare 60 minutes, it’s definitely worth the watch.

  5. 15

    Oct 2013

    Gerard de Lairesse (1641 –1711)

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    Gerard de Lairesse (1641 –1711)

    Lairesse was one of the most celebrated Dutch painters following the death of the great Rembrandt. Lairesse worked as the key illustrator on one of the best anatomical books of the era Ontleding des menschelyken lichaams (1685) by Govert Bidloo. The illustrations were then engraved into copper plates for printing by Abraham Blooteling and Pieter van Gunst.

    Interestingly Ontleding des menschelyken lichaams was not a commercial success at the time and the publisher sold 300 of the extra printed plates to William Cowper, a noted English anatomist.

    Cowper published the plates with his own, English language text in Oxford in 1698 under the title, Anatomy of the humane bodies, without mentioning Bidloo or the artists of the original plates. Cowper went so far as to use Bidloo’s engraved allegorical title page, amended with an irregular piece of paper lettered: “The anatomy of the humane bodies …,” which fits over the Dutch title.

    A number of vitriolic exchanges took place between Bidloo and Cowper, including several pamphlets published in each anatomist’s defence. Cowper claimed, without much evidence presented, that the plates were not Bidloo’s at all, but that they were commissioned by Jan Swammerdam (1637-1680) and that after his death Swammerdam’s widow had sold them to Bidloo.

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