1. 25

    Mar 2014

    Brandon James Scott

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    The Loungers have all been long-time fans of Brandon James Scott’s work. It has it all; consideration, charisma, humour, and longevity. It combines rough textures with lush and harmonious colours.

    On top of his illustrator hat, Mr. Scott he has also worn Art Director, Director, Designer and Writer. Working across an array of fields with a range of clients including JibJab Media, Mattel Entertainment, Ogilvy & Mather, Disney, and Nickelodeon. Mr. Scott is also the creator and art director of the Emmy-nominated Justin Time.

    Clearly hard-working, Mr. Scott has also written and illustrated two children’s books as well as co-illustrating the The Longest Christmas List Ever, alongside JibJab founder Evan Spiridellis.

    You can find more of Mr. Scott’s wonderful work on his website.

  2. 18

    Mar 2014

    Victor Hugo

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    Victor Hugo Queiroz is a 3D artist from Brazil. Winner of multiple awards including CGTalk Choice Award, 3DTotal Excelence Award, and CGHub Gold Award. Hugo currently works for Techno Image, along side previously featured artist, Pedro Conti.

    Self-taught, Hugo has developed a comical manga-influenced style for his personal work. His character’s have large luring eyes, and rubbery skin which further exaggerate their playfulness. I will leave you with a very good quote I read on Hugo’s Facebook page:

    “Everyone has something to learn, everyone has something to teach”

  3. 14

    Mar 2014

    Emma Ríos

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    Spanish born illustrator, Emma Ríos, was a practising architect before she made the transition into comics. Starting off, as many do these day, by self-publishing a miniseries called A Prueba de Balas [Bulletproof]. Ríos’ self-published work and her contributions to fanzines caught the attention of Warren Ellis, who posted her work on his website, which in turn grabbed the attention of Matt Gagnon, offering Ríos a full miniseries at Boom! Studios.

    That miniseres was Hexed, which was released in 2009. Now, with multiple titles under her belt, including a few for Marvel Comics (Dr. Strange: Season One, Osborn, Runaways), Ríos is working on an original ongoing series called Pretty Deadly. Published by Image Comics, the series is notable for multiple reasons, not least its all-female creative team.

    You can see lots of Emma Ríos’ work on her flickr.

  4. 13

    Mar 2014

    Gemma Correll

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    Gemma Correll is a UK based illustrator, know for her guileless style. A style that has garnered her over 236,000 followers on facebook, and clients including Hallmark, The New York Times, Chronicle Books and The Observer. Correll has also published four books to date, her latest being, A Pug’s Guide to Dating.

    Though her style does come under criticism, combining mature subject matters with crude drawings is a tried-and-true technique. One of the most famous and shining examples of this is Maus by Art Spiegelman. Another interesting element of Correll’s style is her regular use of just three colours; black, white and red. A very powerful colour scheme, with strong cultural meaning, that is more often used in design. So yes, Correll’s illustrations can be mistaken as childish, but then that would disregard the maturity and intuition involved to produce them.

    You can find more of Correll’s work on her website, and don’t forget to check out her Daily Diaries.

  5. 10

    Mar 2014

    Adrian Tomine

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    Presenting the very distinctive work of Adrian Tomine. Born in 1974, California, Mr. Tomine started creating and publishing comics whilst he was still in his teens. He distributed his self-published mini-comic, Optic Nerve, to the local comics shops. Nowadays Drawn and Quarterly have taken over Mr. Tomine’s publishing and distribution, leaving him more time to create comics and The New Yorker covers.

    Adrian Tomine style combines clear line work with solid colour and little to no texture. There is a beautiful stillness to his illustrations; harmonious pallet, balanced composition, often eye-level. Tomine’s illustrations feel personal, as if they are family snapshots, which I find especially true of his cover work.

    Be sure to check out more of his work on his website.

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