1. 2

    Mar 2015

    Manga Mondays ~ Kazusa Takashima

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    Born in Hokkaido, Japan, Kazusa Takashima is most known for her yaoi manga. She started self-publishing her work in 1999, but in 2001 her manga Mad Love Chase (aka Harlem Beat wa Yoake Made) was serialization in Japanse magazine Asuka. After the well received debut Takashima went on to produce Last Client and Wild Rock.

    Takashima’s illustrations use very thin uniform lineweight. Her character-centric work ranges from very energetic to sombre. Her yaoi manga, in particular, features very erotic scenes which Takashima’s prefers to focus on intimacy over explicitness.

    You can find more of Kazusa Takashima’s work on her (somewhat outdated) website as well as checking out some of her mangas.

  2. 25

    Feb 2015

    Qarlos Quintero

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    Presenting the work of Columbian 3D artist Qarlos Quintero. Graduate of Jorge Tadeo Lozano University, Quintero has worked professionally as 2D and 3D illustrator since 2008. Currently he is a Concept Artist and 3D Modeler at mobile games developers, Brainz.

    Quintero’s personal project Arya and Nymeria really stands out for me. It is a blending of both his 2D and 3D styles, allow the forms to look flatter and be more expressive with simplified shapes. You can find a healthy dose of more Game of Thrones inspired art, among other work, in Quintero’s ArtStation portfolio. You can also find Qarlos Quintero on Tumblr and Society6.

  3. 19

    Feb 2015

    Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends

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    Last week saw the launch of the National Portrait Gallery’s new major exhibition, Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends. This exhibition focuses on John Singer Sargent’s more personal and experimental paintings. Portraits of prominent actors, writers and musicians of the day. Many of whom were his close friends, including sculptor Auguste Rodin, artists Claude Monet and writer Robert Louis Stevenson.

    This major exhibition of over seventy portraits spans Sargent’s time in London, Paris, Boston and New York as well as his travels in the Italian and English countryside. Important loans from galleries and private collections in Europe and America make this an unmissable opportunity to discover the artist’s most daring, personal and distinctive portraits.

    As an extra treat, throughout the exhibition’s run, it will be accompanied by a range of events including lectures and life drawing.

    Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends is on now and will be concluding on the 25th of May. This is without doubt a must-see exhibition. I highly recommend, if you can, that you make time to go see it.

    Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends
    National Portrait Gallery
    12 February – 25 May 2015
    Tickets
    Full price £16 (with donation)
    Full price £14.50 (without donation)
    Student offer
    Every Tuesday during the exhibition Students can see the exhibition for £13.50 (£12 without donation).
  4. 18

    Feb 2015

    Celine Dahyeu kim

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    It is always heartening to see younger artist with a high level of understanding and skill. Both of which stand out of Celine Kim’s illustrations.

    Living in Pasadena, Kim is a student at the Art Center College of Design studying Visual Development. She is also working on a personal project based on the Norwegian fairy tale East of the Sun and West of the Moon, which has already produced some stunning artwork. She is definitely an illustrator to keep an eye on.

    You can see more of Celine Kim’s work on her tumblr and blogspot, and don’t forget to follow her on twitter.

  5. 10

    Feb 2015

    Martin Brown

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    Martin Brown, along with his partner in crime Terry Deary, are heroes to parents and children across the world. Their combined efforts on Horrible Histories has made reading and learning more fun and accessible to many. Their work, along with their publisher’s Scholastic, have spawn over 100 titles, animated and live-action TV series, video games, theatre and roadshows, a magazine, and a plethora of merchandising. Spanning two decades, Horrible Histories is nothing short of a phenomenon.

    Martin Brown was born 1959 in Melbourne, Australia. After setting his mind on teaching he went to college to become an art teacher. However, he didn’t see it through, rather after a short couple of years working in television, Brown packed his bags and set off to see the world. Like many Aussies, he made his way to London, but unlike most he decided to stay. One can only assume it was the great weather and pace of life that persuaded him. Alternatively, it could have been that fact that he started to get work in what he loved doing, drawing.

    Brown worked his way up, starting from the odd editorial illustration to greeting cards.

    Side note, I went through a phase of collecting greeting cards. Buying one if I ever saw an illustration I liked. Martin Brown’s work being a perticular favourite of mine, I still have them stored away.

    Building up a reputation, Brown soon started drawing for magazines and books. His career got the boost it needed when he landed the job of illustrating Peter Corey’s book, Coping With Parents. The book was published by Hippo Books, an imprint of Scholastic, beginning Brown’s fruitful relationship them. More recently, Martin Brown illustrated a re-issue of The Adventures of the New Cut Gang. Written by the esteemed Philip Pullman, of His Dark Materials fame.

    I have waited and hoped for Martin Brown to claim a corner of the internet where he can put up some of his more personal work, amongst his commercial ones. Sadly that wait goes on. However, for now you can find his illustrations all over the Horrible Histories website. You can, of coarse, just go to your bookshelf and get down your copy of a Horrible Histories book, we all have (at least) one!

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