1. 5

    Aug 2014

    Guillaume Singelin

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    I was happily wasting my time on tumblr, when the incredible artwork of Guillaume Singelin showed up. He is a French comic book illustrator and author whom collaborated with Antoine Ozanam on King David (2008) and Pills (2010). He is also illustrating two ongoing series called The Grocery and Doggybags.

    His cute, yet lively, manga-infused style grabs and holds your attention. His work is skilfully drafted and beautifully rendered. You can see more of Mr Singelin’s artwork on his tumblr, and website.

  2. 4

    Aug 2014

    Paolo Rivera

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    Paolo Rivera is an American comic artist working for Marvel Comics. While still in high school, Mr Rivera met Jim Krueger at Megacon whom helped him get into the industry. His skilful oil painting, due to it’s time-consuming nature, is perfect for covers which he regularly works on. However from 2006 to 2008 Mr Rivera produced richly-painted interior and exterior artwork for the six issue one-shot Mythos. Mr Rivera has since worked as a penciler, inker, and colourist. In 2011 he penciled six issues of Mark Waid’s multiple award-wining Daredevil series.

    Paolo Rivera’s blog, The Self-Absorbing Man, is an absolute treat as it is filled with behind the scenes to Rivera’s creative process and artist advice. Also check out Rivera’s YouTube page which has glorious videos of inking and colouring.

  3. 1

    Aug 2014

    Jim Steranko

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    Today’s dose of inspiration is without a doubt the coolest person to ever work in comics, James F. “Jim” Steranko. Born 1938 in Pennsylvania, Mr Steranko was drawing from a very young age. Influenced, like many, by the standout Sunday comic strip art of Milton Caniff, Alex Raymond, Hal Foster, and Chester Gould.

    In 1957 Mr Steranko got his foot in the the comic industry as an inker. His first published penciled work was in Spyman #1 (1966), which he wrote the story “The Birth of a Hero”. It was published under Harvey Thriller, an imprint of Harvey Comics.

    It wasn’t until he moved to Marvel Comics that he really made a name for himself. Working on the spy stories of Nick Fury, Mr Steranko really started to stretch the comic medium. He experimented with layout and sequencing, and most notably bought in elements of Surrealism, Pop Art, Op Art, and graphic design. What Mr Steranko was doing was groundbreaking, and caused waves not only in the comic medium, but also in film too.

    In 1969 Mr Steranko formed his own publishing company, Supergraphics, and in 1970 and 1972 published The Steranko History of Comics volume 1 and 2 respectively. These tabloid-sized books, written by Mr Sterenko also featured the first, and in some cases only, interviews with many creators from the comic book Golden Age. At the time the volumes were well received, and today are very sought after. Although, not everyone agreed with their content. At a San Diego Comic-Con Bob Kane had a few word to say to Mr Sterenko about his chapter on Batman, what unfolded is priceless. Last year Mr Steranko explained the whole story on twitter.

    Outside of comics Mr Steranko has also shared his talents as a concept artist for film, including Steven Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark and Francis Ford Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula. He has also worked on movie posters, production designs and has written an episode for the DC Comics animated TV series Justice League Unlimited.

    Unsurprisingly his amazing contributions to the comic industry has earned him many awards, not least a Shazam Award for Outstanding Achievement by an Individual, and a place in the esteemed Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame.

    I have only scratched the surface of what an important person Mr Steranko is to the industry, to find out more check out The Drawings of Steranko website. Also, a small but nice collection of his work can be seen here, and of course you should follow him on twitter.

  4. 31

    Jul 2014

    Olle Eksell (1918 – 2007)

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    Olle Eksell is a celebrated and distinguished Swedish graphic designer. He is most famous for his iconic Mazetti Cacao Eye design.

    He was born in 1918 in Kopparberg. Mr Eksell, knew from very young age that he wanted to become an advertising illustrator. Between 1930 to 1941, he studied illustration and graphic art in Stockholm. After graduating Mr Eksell found work at the Ervaco advertising agency in Sweden. After getting married however, decided to sail to America where he and his wife continued their studies at the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles.

    Throughout his career he worked on advertising posters, logos, postcards and products. His avant-garde, yet timeless, approach garnered him membership to the AGI, countless awards, and an honorary Professorship from the Swedish Government.

    A great place to find out more about Olle Eksell is on the official website. The best place to see more of his work is in the beautiful book aptly titled, Olle Eksell: Swedish Graphic Designer.

  5. 30

    Jul 2014

    Matthew Woodson

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    Matthew Woodson is an American illustrator whom I have admired for some time. His illustrations are not just beautiful, they are poetic. Mr Woodson graduated from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 2006, landing a job straight away, and has been freelancing ever since.

    Though predominately keeping busy with editorial work, Mr Woodson has worked with a variety of clients and projects. Some of his notable clients include American Express, Dazed & Confused Magazine, ESPN, Mondo Posters, The New York Times, Randomhouse Publishing, Royal Mail, Vogue, and the list goes on.

    If you have a penchant for the more verbose illustrator, you will definitely enjoy his blog, where he often gives a some background to his work and some insight to his process. You can also check out more of Mr Woodson’s work on his website.

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