1. 14

    Mar 2014

    Emma Ríos

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    Spanish born illustrator, Emma Ríos, was a practising architect before she made the transition into comics. Starting off, as many do these day, by self-publishing a miniseries called A Prueba de Balas [Bulletproof]. Ríos’ self-published work and her contributions to fanzines caught the attention of Warren Ellis, who posted her work on his website, which in turn grabbed the attention of Matt Gagnon, offering Ríos a full miniseries at Boom! Studios.

    That miniseres was Hexed, which was released in 2009. Now, with multiple titles under her belt, including a few for Marvel Comics (Dr. Strange: Season One, Osborn, Runaways), Ríos is working on an original ongoing series called Pretty Deadly. Published by Image Comics, the series is notable for multiple reasons, not least its all-female creative team (hello 21st century…we have arrived).

    You can see lots of Emma Ríos’ work on her flickr.

  2. 13

    Mar 2014

    Gemma Correll

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    Gemma Correll is a UK based illustrator, know for her guileless style. A style that has garnered her over 236,000 followers on facebook, and clients including Hallmark, The New York Times, Chronicle Books and The Observer. Correll has also published four books to date, her latest being, A Pug’s Guide to Dating.

    Though her style does come under criticism, combining mature subject matters with crude drawings is a tried-and-true technique. One of the most famous and shining examples of this is Maus by Art Spiegelman. Another interesting element of Correll’s style is her regular use of just three colours; black, white and red. A very powerful colour scheme, with strong cultural meaning, that is more often used in design. So yes, Correll’s illustrations can be mistaken as childish, but then that would disregard the maturity and intuition involved to produce them.

    You can find more of Correll’s work on her website, and don’t forget to check out her Daily Diaries.

  3. 10

    Mar 2014

    Adrian Tomine

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    Presenting the very distinctive work of Adrian Tomine. Born in 1974, California, Mr. Tomine started creating and publishing comics whilst he was still in his teens. He distributed his self-published mini-comic, Optic Nerve, to the local comics shops. Nowadays Drawn and Quarterly have taken over Mr. Tomine’s publishing and distribution, leaving him more time to create comics and The New Yorker covers.

    Adrian Tomine style combines clear line work with solid colour and little to no texture. There is a beautiful stillness to his illustrations; harmonious pallet, balanced composition, often eye-level. Tomine’s illustrations feel personal, as if they are family snapshots, which I find especially true of his cover work.

    Be sure to check out more of his work on his website.

  4. 7

    Mar 2014

    Eleanor Davis

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    Eleanor Davis is an award-winning illustrator and a talented storyteller. She has two graphic novels under her belt, The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, Stinky, with a third, titled How to Be Happy, set for release this year.

    Consistently producing both clients and personal work, Davis’ work is nothing less than exquisite. I am besotted by its sensitivity. Her storytelling devices and illustration style adapt to the story she is telling, but the results are always equally fulfilling. You can see some of her short comics here. Also, take the time to check our Davis’ sketchblog, seeing all her doodle and ideas is a real feast for the senses.

  5. 6

    Mar 2014

    Vera Brosgol

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    Storyboard and comic artist Vera Brosgol was born in Moscow, but has lived in the United States since the age of five. She contributed to 3 volumes the Flight anthologies and gained broad recognition with her first graphic novel, Anya’s Ghost. Published in 2011 by First Second Books, it won Brosgol an Will Eisner award in Best Publication for Teens.

    You can check out more of Vera Brosgol’s work on her website. She has not updated her blog in a short while, but you can have plenty of fun sieving through the archive, where you can find posts like this, about her process.

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