Category: Sculptural
  1. 31

    Oct 2014

    J.A.W. Cooper

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    I follow quite a few illustrators on Instagram, but recently the work of J.A.W. Cooper has been blowing me away. You know when you complete an illustration, take a step back and think to yourself, “Yes! Nailed it”. Well, that’s what I imagine Ms Cooper is doing every time right before she uploads a new picture to her Instagram.

    Born in England but currently living in Los Angeles, Ms Cooper is a freelance illustrator, sculpture, jewelry maker and member of the Prisma Collective. Professionally she illustrates for the entertainment and advertising industry creating storyboards, concept and character design. Personally she frequently produces work for galleries. Her work has been exhibited in Gallery Nucleus, Spoke Art Gallery, and La Luz de Jesus Gallery.

    J.A.W. Cooper regularly updates her blog. Which is of course filled with her beautiful artwork, and lots of photographs of her process. So much so that she set up a separate tutorial section just for it. Ms Cooper breaks down her process step-by-step and explains her thinking as well as highlight problematic areas of her process. It is full of good tips, and very helpful to see such detailed breakdowns of her work.

    You can find more J.A.W. Cooper on her website.

  2. 16

    Jul 2014

    Eugène Grasset (1845 – 1917)

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    Alongside the Pre-Raphaelites, Art Nouveau is tied as my favourite art movement. I take every opportunity to see Art Nouveau exhibits, but to be honest, until recently I had never taken much note of Eugène Grasset. This is quite a large oversight, considering he has been called “The Father of Art Nouveau”.

    So who is this pioneering artist? Born 1845 (or possibly 1841) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Eugène Samuel Grasset was surrounded by creativity from a young age. His father was a cabinetmaker and sculptor, and little Eugène learnt to draw under the guise of Francois-Louis David Bocion. In 1861 he went to Zurich to study architecture at the polytechnical school. After which, in 1865, he took what would become an influential visit to Egypt. Throughout his twenties he devoted himself to painting and sculpture.

    At the age of 26 he arrived in Paris, influenced by his travels and a new found love for Japanese Art, Mr Grasset tried his hand at creating ceramics, tapestry, and jewellery. His decorative pieces were crafted from precious materials including ivory and gold. Much of this unique work is considered a cornerstone of Art Nouveau motifs.

    Mr Grasset would later gain recognition as an illustrator due to his contribution to the stories Le Petit Nab (1877) and Histoire de quatre fils Aymon (1883). Quickly moving on to applied arts he designed the facade of the Hôtel de Dumas in Paris, mosaics in Saint Etienne in Braire, and stained glass windows in the Orléans Cathedral. With a multitude of artistic ability to call upon Mr Grasset had a natural affinity to poster design. Fortunate, as French posters design was becoming very popular Stateside, so it was not long before he was contacted by various American companies. His successful commissions led to him illustrating the 1892 Christmas issue of Harper’s Magazine.

    Interesting footnote one of his images, The Wooly Horse, was so popular that Louis Comfort Tiffany was inspired to recreate it in stained glass.

    Mr Grasset spent much of his latter years teaching in various schools across Paris. Many of his students went on to become eminent artist themselves, unsurprisingly, a lot of them within the Art Nouveau movement. His versatility, instincts and ability not only influenced those whom he had taught, but also prominent artist like Alphonse Mucha, and left a stirring mark on the Arts and Artists that followed.

  3. 26

    Feb 2014

    Adam Foreman

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    Adam Foreman aka A4man (get it?), is an illustrator, animator, sculptor and designer. He has worked with multi award-winning independent game developers Size Five Games on the video game Gun Monkeys. Mr. Foreman also worked on trading card artwork for the video game Hack, Slash, Loot!. His geometric style really exaggerates the quirkiness of his characters. Check out his website for more work.

  4. 19

    Nov 2013

    Irma Gruenholz

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    Born in Madrid, Spain, Irma Gruenholz creates marvellous hand-made clay models. Pastel-toned, with a hint of surrealism, her crafted illustrations have been used for books, magazines, advertisements, prototypes and props. Her pieces are made quite large and are a combination of materials including modelling clay, paper, metal, wood and a assortment of found objects.

    You can get an excellent behind-the-scenes view of the process on Gruenholz’s blog, and see more work on her website.

  5. 3

    Jun 2013

    Manga Mondays ~ May Ann Licudine

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    Absolutely beautiful work from this month’s Manga Mondays artist. May Ann Licudine, aka Mall, lives and works in the Philippines. Her portfolio is a mixed bag with pieces ranging from fun and dream-like to sombre. One look at it reveals she is equally skilled in both sculpture and illustration. I personally adore her brightly-coloured paintings, preferably the ones with cats. Check out more of her work on her deviantArt page.

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