Category: Satirical
  1. 13

    Mar 2014

    Gemma Correll

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    Gemma Correll is a UK based illustrator, know for her guileless style. A style that has garnered her over 236,000 followers on facebook, and clients including Hallmark, The New York Times, Chronicle Books and The Observer. Correll has also published four books to date, her latest being, A Pug’s Guide to Dating.

    Though her style does come under criticism, combining mature subject matters with crude drawings is a tried-and-true technique. One of the most famous and shining examples of this is Maus by Art Spiegelman. Another interesting element of Correll’s style is her regular use of just three colours; black, white and red. A very powerful colour scheme, with strong cultural meaning, that is more often used in design. So yes, Correll’s illustrations can be mistaken as childish, but then that would disregard the maturity and intuition involved to produce them.

    You can find more of Correll’s work on her website, and don’t forget to check out her Daily Diaries.

  2. 19

    Feb 2014

    Kate Beaton

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    Canadian comics artist Kate Beaton is a best known for her hugely popular webcomic Hark! A Vagrant. Born in Nova Scotia, Beaton studied history in New Brunswick. Her interest in history, and historic figures form a re-occuring theme in her work. As exemplified in her self-published book Never Learn Anything from History, which won her a Doug Wright Award for Best Emerging Talent in 2009. Continuing the award momentum, Beaton’s Hark! A Vagrant won the 2011 Harvey Award for Best Online Comics Work, and she topped that in 2012 winning three Harveys, for Humor, Online Work, and Best Cartoonist.

    For those of you (myself included) whom like your comics a little more on the tangible side, you can pick yourself up a Hark! A Vagrant book.

  3. 15

    Nov 2013

    R. S. Sherriffs (1906 – 1960)

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    Robert Stewart Sherriffs was born in Arbroath, Scotland. He attended Edinburgh College of Art where he studied heraldic design along with fine art. Just before turning 21, Sherriffs moved to London.
    He found work in advertising studios, however grew tiered of the tedious nature of the work so he began sending examples of caricatures to magazine. He got his break when the weekly tabloid magazine, Bystander, published his caricature of actor John Barrymore (yep, Drew Barrymore’s granddad). The illustration caught the eye of Beverley Nichols, who commissioned Sherriffs to produce a series of portraits for his column in The Sketch.

    This exposure led to further work in magazines including Theatre World, Pall Mall, and The Strand Magazine. He also regularly contributed to The Radio Times and later on Punch magazine. Sherriffs also illustrated a number of books, including The Life and Death of Tamburlaine the Great, and Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. The former was comended by one of Sherriffs important influences, Edmund Dulac.

    There is a sad turn of events to Sherriffs’ career. He had intended to bring together some of his personal drawings for an exhibition. However, after being diagnosed with cancer, he set fire to all his work prior to being admitted to hospital. Sherriffs died at the age of 54.

    I was introduced to R. S. Sherriffs by the current exhibition at The Cartoon Museum, Age of Glamour: R. S. Sherriffs’ Stars of Stage and Screen. There were various pieces including portraits, set, and costume design. Throughout the whole exhibition I had my jaw wide open. Sherriffs is a master. His control of the brush is some of the best I have had the pleasure of seeing first hand. His lines perfectly sweep thin to thick. His tones are one flat colour. Throughout the exhibition I can not remember seeing any cover-ups or mistakes. The first thing I wanted to do when I left the exhibition was buy a big book full of his work, but alas, no such luck. The closest thing published of a body of Sherriffs’ work is Sherriffs at the Cinema, which solely concentrates on his famous caricatures.

    I feel some of his previous printed material do not do his illustrations justice. The last book of his work was published in the 1980s. Sherriffs’ work desperately demands a modern, more befitting, bounded showcase to be fully appreciated. (ahem, publishers please take note)

    You can find more information on R. S. Sherriffs on the National Portrait Gallery, Chris Beetles Gallery, and the British Cartoon archive websites.

    Age of Glamour is on until 24th December 2013, and if you can, I definitely advise you to check it out.

  4. 11

    Oct 2013

    Josh Cochran

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    In 2013, his work on Ben Kweller’s “Go Fly A Kite” received a Grammy nomination for Best Limited Edition Packaging. He has a number of side projects, and sometimes exhibits his silkscreens and drawings in galleries. Currently, Josh is working on his first children’s book, “New York, Inside And Out” (2014). Josh lives in Brooklyn with his small dog Porkchop.

    Josh’s professional creative work spans prestigious clients such as American Express, AOL, HSBC Bank, IBM and the New Yorker.

    Josh we salute you!

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