Category: Realistic
  1. 20

    Oct 2014

    Book Review ~ Ed Sheeran “A Visual Journey”

    by
    ed-sheeran-book-phillip-butah ed-sheeran-book-phillip-butah1 ed-sheeran-book-phillip-butah2 ed-sheeran-book-phillip-butah3 ed-sheeran-book-phillip-butah4

    Before I get into this book review, I just want to make it clear that I have a personal interest in this book and the artist behind it, Mr Phillip Butah.

    I have known Phillip for some time now in a professional and personal capacity. His work has always inspired me and I was all too happy and humbled to provide him with my opinions when he first opened the conversation about putting this book together. Also for our Blog readers, it’s worth noting that this book is not an out and out art book, it’s more of an illustrated book of autobiographical memoirs. I would therefore recommend it to both fans of Ed Sheeran’s music and fans of illustration and portraiture alike. Although much of the accompanying visuals are the work of artist Phillip Butah, there is also some varied and complimentary photography.

    The Book Review:
    The UK version of the book (to which I have kindly been gifted a first edition of by Phillip himself) is published by Cassell Illustrated a division of Octopus Publishing Group Ltd.

    The hardback cover is a bright and striking luminous green wrapped in luxurious soft touch lamination. The cover contains a simple line illustration of Ed looking rather humble. This I felt was an excellent precursor to the overall flavour of the book which takes us on a journey through Ed’s more humble beginnings up until his latest’s album release. In fact humility is often an underlining feature within both Phillip Butah’s artistic portraits and Ed Sheeran’s music.

    Phillip’s forward highlights this fact quite clearly when he talks about the need to put in at least 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to become really good at any discipline. He also explains how even though both himself and Ed have made the necessary sacrifices to get to the level they are at, they both instinctively know and feel they can always do more and always do better. He also talks about this at the end of the book (which is dedicated to Phillip and the way in which he works) where he states that he is his “own worst critic”, with an eye for seeing his own work’s imperfections.

    The book contains a variety of artistic styles and approaches however I find that its Phillip’s signature realism style that shines through. His images often look like he has deliberately peeled back some of the layers to reveal the inner workings and techniques used to create them. Leaving areas of the portraits only subtly rendered to create depth and interest. I personally like this idea as it creates a sense of imbalance or drama and can help draw your eye to what the artist finds interesting and what he wants to reveal about the person he is drawing.

    Some of the styles in the book include inspiration from Czech artist Alphonse Mucha and even Soviet propaganda art. He treats us to a variety of mediums including, pencils, watercolour & pen, biro sketches, full blown pastel renders and graphite on paper chiaroscuro illustrations.

    Ed Sheeran “a visual journey” is available to buy now. I think we will be seeing a lot more of Phillip Butah and his collaborations with Ed Sheeran.

    Ed Sheeran “a visual journey”
    Hardcover
    208 pages
    24.8 x 19.6 x 2.2 cm
  2. 17

    Oct 2014

    I’d Love To Draw by Andrew Loomis

    by
    id-love-to-draw-01 id-love-to-draw-02 id-love-to-draw-03 id-love-to-draw-04 id-love-to-draw-05 id-love-to-draw-06 id-love-to-draw-07 id-love-to-draw-08

    I’d Love To Draw is out today in the UK! To celebrate Titan books have kindly sent over some rare photographs of the original book Andrew Loomis created.

    I’d Love To Draw was started by the Andrew Loomis, but he unfortunately died in 1959 before its completion. Held in the Loomis family archives for decades, the book’s existence was entirely unknown outside of the Loomis family – until now. Lovingly restored by a team of experts, including the globally-renowned and respected artist Alex Ross, Titan Books are finally publishing Loomis’ lost legacy. This facsimile edition finally completes the Loomis legacy at long last.

    We will have a full review of the book soon.

  3. 13

    Oct 2014

    Jens Claessens

    by
    jens-claessens-01 jens-claessens-02 jens-claessens-03 jens-claessens-04 jens-claessens-05 jens-claessens-06

    Presenting the very lush work of Jens Claessens. Based in Antwerp, Belgium, Mr Claessens is a freelance visual development artist. As a freelancer and alongside visual development studio Votla he has worked with companies including Microsoft, Ubisoft, Sony, THQ, Mattel, and Warner Brother Games.

    One of Mr Claessens’ few comic was published in the very nifty mini Comicanthologie, DOLOR, amongst some very good company including Francis Vallejo and Michael Meier. Mr Claessens’ work has also been featured on the packaging for a Belgium bakery, Generous. Which in turn earned them two CCB Awards.

    To find more of Jens Claessens, head over to his website and blog.

  4. 23

    Sep 2014

    Nimit Malavia

    by
    nimit-malavia-01 nimit-malavia-02 nimit-malavia-03 nimit-malavia-04 nimit-malavia-05 nimit-malavia-06

    Seriously stunning work from today’s feature, the award-winning illustrator, Nimit Malavia. Born Ottawa, Canada in 1987, he studied Illustration at the Sheridan Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning. Currently based in Toronto, Mr Malavia’s work has been exhibited across North America and Europe in galleries including Gallery Nucleus, Spoke Art Gallery, Bold Hype Gallery, Thinkspace Gallery, LeBasse Projects, and London Miles Gallery.

    Mr Malavia’s has created numerous comic covers for Marvel, DC, and IDW. He is also the current Fables series cover artist, starting at issue #139 it is expected that Mr Malavia will continue until the series conclusion issue #150. Outside of the world of comics, he has worked with companies including PEN Canada, Soapbox Design, the National Post and 20th Century Fox.

    You can find Nimit Malavia’s portfolio on his website, and I strongly recommend you check out his instagram too.

  5. 22

    Sep 2014

    Book Review ~ The Art of John Alvin

    by
    john-alvin-01 john-alvin-02 john-alvin-03 john-alvin-04 john-alvin-05 john-alvin-06

    Editor’s Note:

    John Alvin was an American movie artist who painted movie poster art for over 130 films, including E.T., Blade Runner, The Lion King, The Princess Bride and Jurassic Park, as well as the Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and Pirates of the Caribbean film series. He also produced work for Disney Fine Art (Disney character official portraits).

    The Book Review:

    I have been going afoot with The Art of John Alvin under my arm for about a week now, and I have been stopped by people who recognize the E.T. image. Once I say, “yes, it’s the art of John Alvin”, they just stare back at me blankly.

    The book’s first line of introduction surmises, rather well, the career and work of John Alvin:

    “Hollywood’s best kept secret”

    No doubt reading through the list of films in the editors note you had a vivid image of each of the movie posters mentioned. John Alvin’s artwork is entwined with movie history, with many of his poster just as memorable as the films themselves.

    Reading through the book you get a real sense of what Mr Alvin built, and what boundaries he broke. Way before photo compositions were common place, he was achieving them using friskets made from transparent paper. There is a nice quote right at the end of the book that perfectly sums up Mr Alvin’s work ethic and his keenness for innovation, written by Farah Alvin (John’s daughter), she says:

    “If there was no tool to make something happen, he’d make it himself”

    One of the things I really appreciated about this book is that 30+ plus posters have at least two dedicated pages each. The first page of each poster explains the clients requirements, any possible problem, and the solution. It is a real treat to have this amount of insight. It also helps you admire the work, that little bit more, knowing the restrictions faced.

    Another interesting tidbit I found out from reading the book was that John Alvin was allowed to sign a few of his movie posters. I bet you have never spotted the small “Alvin” hidden in his posters despite probably staring at them hundreds of times. I naturally then spent the following hour carefully looking for his signature in many of his posters. If like me, you now have time and that uncontrollable urge to satisfy, you can start with the Blade Runner poster.

    I get the feeling Mr Alvin was quite content contributing to such a prodigious industry from in the adumbrate walls of his studio. However, it is somewhat a shame an artist like John Alvin with work so recognizable to have his name be virtually unknown. Thankfully The Art of John Alvin aims to remedy this, with a beautiful collection of work, cementing his name to the art for moviegoers and illustrators alike.

    Small sidenote: It is particularly enjoyable if you were a child of the 80s and 90s when whilst reading the book you suddenly realize that John Alvin is responsible for a great deal of your moviegoing joy.

    The Art of John Alvin
    Titan Books
    Hardcover
    160 pages
    31.5 x 23.1 x 2 cm
Back to Top