Category: Realistic
  1. 23

    Aug 2014

    Alex Raymond (1909 – 1956)

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    Alexander Gillespie Raymond was born in New Rochelle, New York. An American cartoonist, best known for creating Flash Gordon. He is the definitive “artist’s artist”, with a host of admirers as well as impersonators. Most of comic leading figures have singled out Mr Raymond as significant influence on their work, include Jack Kirby, Bob Kane, John Buscema, Joe Kubert, John Romita Jr. and Alex Toth. With many, many others, it’s probably easier to list the artist whom have not been influenced by Mr Raymond’s work.

    Alex Raymond showed an early interest in illustration and was encouraged by his father. After graduating from the Grand Central School of Art in New York City he went on to become an assistant illustrator on strips such as Tillie the Toiler and Tim Tyler’s Luck.

    In a space of 20 years he created and worked on multiple titles across a range of genres. In 1933, Mr Raymond created the science-fiction comic hero Flash Gordon. Before long it had become more popular than it’s competitor, Buck Rogers. In 1946 he created the detective strip Rip Kirby. Another huge hit running for over 50 years, until 1999.

    In 1956, Mr Raymond died in a car crash at the age of 46. Herald during his life, he was awarded the Reuben Award from the National Cartoonists Society and was posthumously inducted into both the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame and Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame.

    Fellow comic artist, Dave Sims started a series, way back in 2008, called The Strange Death Of Alex Raymond. It is currently unfinished, so Mr Sims has turned to Patreon for help to complete it.

    You can find much of Alex Raymond’s work around the web, but if you want to invest in a couple of his books I strongly recommend Alex Raymond: His Life and Art (if you find it at a good price) and IDW’s Rip Kirby’s reprints.

  2. 4

    Aug 2014

    Paolo Rivera

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    Paolo Rivera is an American comic artist working for Marvel Comics. While still in high school, Mr Rivera met Jim Krueger at Megacon whom helped him get into the industry. His skilful oil painting, due to it’s time-consuming nature, is perfect for covers which he regularly works on. However from 2006 to 2008 Mr Rivera produced richly-painted interior and exterior artwork for the six issue one-shot Mythos. Mr Rivera has since worked as a penciler, inker, and colourist. In 2011 he penciled six issues of Mark Waid’s multiple award-wining Daredevil series.

    Paolo Rivera’s blog, The Self-Absorbing Man, is an absolute treat as it is filled with behind the scenes to Rivera’s creative process and artist advice. Also check out Rivera’s YouTube page which has glorious videos of inking and colouring.

  3. 30

    Jul 2014

    Matthew Woodson

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    Matthew Woodson is an American illustrator whom I have admired for some time. His illustrations are not just beautiful, they are poetic. Mr Woodson graduated from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 2006, landing a job straight away, and has been freelancing ever since.

    Though predominately keeping busy with editorial work, Mr Woodson has worked with a variety of clients and projects. Some of his notable clients include American Express, Dazed & Confused Magazine, ESPN, Mondo Posters, The New York Times, Randomhouse Publishing, Royal Mail, Vogue, and the list goes on.

    If you have a penchant for the more verbose illustrator, you will definitely enjoy his blog, where he often gives a some background to his work and some insight to his process. You can also check out more of Mr Woodson’s work on his website.

  4. 11

    Jul 2014

    David Remfry

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    David Remfry was born 1942 in Worthing, England and is currently living and working in New York City. Mr Remfry graduated from Hull College of Art in 1964, and almost 10 years later, in 1973, he held his first solo show in London. Since then, he has had over 50 solo exhibitions across Europe and America.

    Through his career Mr Remfry has gained a highly regarded reputation as a draftsman and watercolourist. Best known for his practically life-size paintings, and his urban subjects. In 1987 Mr Remfry was elected a member of the Royal Watercolour Society. The honours did not stop there, in 2001 he was awarded the M.B.E. for services to British Art, and in 2006 he was elected a Member of the Royal Academy of Arts.

    Though David Remfry is distinctly a fine artist, having never worked in a commercial capacity, in 2002 Stella McCartney approached him to produce a series of drawings for her exclusive collection of women’s clothing for ABSOLUT vodka. A rather rare move as her contemporaries were exclusively using photography of glamour models. Yet, here was Stella McCartney using Mr Remfry’s drawings for billboard advertising. Mr Remfry embarked on the project not as a fashion illustrator, but as an artist. In doing so the focus was not solely on the garments, but on the person wearing them. His drawings had more expression and incorporated a more human element that can sometimes be missed in both fashion illustration and photography. The response was decidedly positive. So much so that in 2003 the Victoria and Albert Museum exhibited the work in a show titled, David Remfry Drawings for Stella McCartney.

    Sadly I haven’t found a single website that has a large body of David Remfry’s work. But you can find his pieces on places like Pinterest. You can also check out his book, David Remfry: Dancers, it has over 80 paintings and drawings spanning over 30 years of his artistic career.

  5. 25

    Jun 2014

    Interview ~ John Harris

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    Last month saw Titan’s release of The Art of John Harris – Beyond the Horizon. A carefully curated collection of artist John Harris’ recent work and older pieces. It’s large format beautifully showcases a variety of Mr. Harris’ futuristic paintings, sketches, acrylics and watercolours.

    To celebrate, Titan Books very kindly gave us the opportunity to interview John Harris about the book and his carer.

    Q. You have dedicated over 30 years to Sci-Fi. What attracted you into the genre, and what is it about Sci-Fi that has sustained your interest?

    A. The sense of a larger perspective, wider horizons, the unknown, something about the evolutionary possibilities of Man. All of that.

    Q. You often seem to combine of the fantastical with the plausible, incorporating building and mechanical structures that are familiar. Is this a conscious effort to make your worlds more believable?

    A. Yes, this is a crucial point, mixing the possible with the apparently impossible. We may pretend to know the difference but actually, we just don’t know what is possible. Embedding fantasy within the known and credible, makes it easier to relate to, and also raises the question ‘how?’. There is excitement there, in that question.

    Q. Born in London, you now live and work in Devon. How much do you think your environment influences your work?

    A. Yes, living in a rural setting has definitely shaped a lot of the imagery. The weather and the light that springs from it makes its presence felt in much of the work. And the cycle of growth and decay which is always in your face here, is constantly finding its way in.

    Q. Do you stick to a routine when producing your artwork?

    A. No, I try to break routines when I become aware of them. When I get into habits of production, I start repeating myself in the work.

    Q. How important is it for you that the final image matches the vision you have in your head?

    A. This is a delicate point. I do usually have a clear image in my head to begin with, but inevitably accidents occur (and I encourage these), which may suggest alternative directions. I try to keep open to them. But some images are imperative and demand to be produce, willy nilly.

    Q. At the Lounge our primary goal is to widen artists’ pool of inspiration. So who are the artist/illustrators that inspire you?

    A. Just about every artist I have ever seen, has something I would like to have. I think all artists are basically magpies and too many to mention have contributed to what I am.

    That said, when I was a student, I identified very closely with the work of the English Romantics like Turner and John Martin. They influenced my direction, as did the Surrealists. From a technical point of view, Whistler was a great teacher for me and more recently Graham Sutherland. All very Old School, I know.

    Q. Reading about your career, you have achieved a great deal. So what’s on the horizon for you? Do you have any artistic goals that you are still chasing?

    A. I feel (like most artist, I suspect) that I’ve hardly started. And yet, looking at the collection in this book, I see that I’m travelling in a definite direction. But what the goal is, who knows? That’s beyond the horizon.

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