Category: Fashion
  1. 28

    Feb 2014

    Fashion Fridays ~ António Soares

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    António Soares is a fashion illustrator based in Portugal, and represented by German agency Candy. Mr. Soares’ soft watercolours and graceful lines give his illustrations a whimsical feeling. It is as if his figures are a vague memory, or a dream, on the cusp of fading completely.

    Go to Mr. Soares’ tumblr to see more of his work.

  2. 18

    Feb 2014

    Geneviève Godbout

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    Genevieve Godbout is a children’s book and fashion illustrator based in London. Originally from Quebec, she studied animation in Montreal, then at the prestigious Gobelins in Paris. Godbout has worked with the likes of Disney, les editions Milan, and La Pastèque.

    Godbout’s soft pointillistic style is used to create tranquil scenes, vast in colour but never over-whelming. A perfect combination for children’s books.

    You can see more of her work on her blog, Rose-a-Petits-Pois.

  3. 27

    Nov 2013

    Earl Oliver Hurst (1895 – 1958)

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    An inductee of the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame, Earl Oliver Hurst’s work is unmistakeable. Born in 1898 New York, Mr. Hurst’s career was exceptionally successful, of course, not without a difficulty. He chopped and changed his path and titles quite a few times but worked with a host of clients along the way. Some of his well known magazine work includes Collier’s, American Weekly, True, Pictorial Review, McCalls, and Home Magazine. Also doing numerous advertising illustrations for the likes of Nabisco, Royal Crown Cola, General Electric, Sanka, Jantzen Swim Suits, and Swan Soap.

    A decidedly wonderful book of his work was published by Hermes Press in 2005 called, The Art Of Earl Oliver Hurst. If you are luck enough to find it at a reasonable price, it’s definitely worth picking up.

    There is a great article on Hurst and his working habits on the Society of Illustrators website. For now I will leave you with this interesting quote:

    “You will never find a deliberately drawn line in a Hurst illustration: only a swift-moving brush will produce that sense of alive-ness which is the essential characteristic of his work”

    — Ernest Watson, 1942

  4. 8

    Nov 2013

    Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright

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    Editor’s Note:

    David Wright was one of the leading pin-up artists of the 20th Century. Unlike his American contemporaries Alberto Vargas and Gil Elvgren, the British-born Wright brought a sense of realism to his willowy beauties, who appeared in publications on both sides of the Atlantic, especially during WW2. Now, finally, access has been granted to his archive, and this is the first ever collection of his work.

    The Book Review:

    Sirens opens up with a enjoyable forward from David’s son, Patrick. Speaking of the many hours his father spent in his studio, Patrick confesses to never really knowing what he did all day. From the introduction onwards, the author give a short history of David Wright, his career and the impact his work had at the time. Starting from page 18, the majority of the book is beautiful large full-page pin-ups.

    Looking through such a large body of work you start to see what sets David Wright’s work from some of his contemporaries. Many of his pieces do not have that “gloss” that a lot of the American pin-ups had. They feel a little sketchier, a little moodier. His women have all the glamour of the 1950s, but are presented with more depth. Most of his women seem withdrawn in their thoughts, many without a hint of a smile. A far cry from the happy-go-lucky pin-ups we are used to seeing. Past simply relying on scantily clad models to create eroticism, David Wright’s women are not just sat in their bedrooms smiling for the camera, their pensive demeanour is inviting you in. To this regard, Wright’s work remind me more of the sophisticated women of Robert McGinnis, than the idealized women of Gil Elvgren.

    If I were to have a gripe about the book, it would be that the image quality of the pictures vary. The majority of them are perfect, however, when you stumble on a few slightly lower quality ones it somewhat interrupts your experience. The other thing, which I know is just my personal taste, it would have been nice to see some more roughs or sketches.

    With that said, David Wright’s women truly are beautiful and Sirens is a decidedly bonny body of his work, with enough variety to keep you engaged, and in my case, wanting more. Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright is available to buy right now, and if you are a fan of Carol Day, pulp or pin-up this is definitely one for you.

    Sirens: The Pin-Up Art of David Wright
    Titan Books
    Hardback with dust jacket
    192 pages
    310 x 228mm
  5. 3

    Sep 2013

    Christopher Cunetto

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    Christopher Cunetto is currently living and working from Washington DC. In his own words:

    “My style is saturated, narrative, and figurative – imagery that plays with conventions of seriousness, melodrama, and camp.”

    His techniques range from quick-mark, bold colour fashion illustration to fully rendered work created using coloured pencils. His clients include Washington Post Express, Metro Weekly, Fashion Fights Poverty and Columbia Books.

    Christopher also co-founded the art collective ‘Boys Be Good’, and after checking out their online zines, I thought they had some great content that I’d never come across before.

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