Category: Fantasy
  1. 14

    Jul 2014

    Manga Mondays ~ Kyoung Seok Oh

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    Kyoung Seok Oh aka Alien1452, is a manga artist based in Seoul, Korea. Heavily involved in video games, he has previously worked on MMORPGs including Steal Fighter and Neo Steam. Kyoung Seok is currently working with game publishers Seed9.

    Mr Oh definitely has a nepotism towards female characters. Their personality vary from innocent to hard-nosed, but their physiques are always distinctly voluptuous. However, his renderings are varied, especially in his personal work, he does not seem to stick with one style or a set pallet. Mr Oh’s colouring definitely feels more experimental and expressive, and brings an extra layer of interest to his work.

    To see more of Kyoung Seok Oh’s illustrations you can check out his naver blog, DeviantArt page, and watch him work on Livestream.

  2. 7

    Jul 2014

    Manga Mondays ~ Jung Myung Lee

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    Jung Myung Lee aka Rupid 79 is Korean fantasy artist. You may recognise his work from his contributions to the hugely successful card battle game, Legend of the Cryptids. His art subsequently features in the Legend of Monsters Official Art Book (Japanese Language).

    Jung Myung Lee’s artwork is full of action and full of intricate details. They are multi-layered, rarely using less than three planes. Even when he strips away elements his illustrations are still more detailed than most.

    There was once a Rupid 79 page in each of the illustrative corners of the internet, but they all seem to have disappeared. I have managed to dig up a couple places that he is still using (for now at least). Check out his DrawCrowd page, and for those of you versed in Korean, he has a blog too.

  3. 25

    Jun 2014

    Interview ~ John Harris

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    Last month saw Titan’s release of The Art of John Harris – Beyond the Horizon. A carefully curated collection of artist John Harris’ recent work and older pieces. It’s large format beautifully showcases a variety of Mr. Harris’ futuristic paintings, sketches, acrylics and watercolours.

    To celebrate, Titan Books very kindly gave us the opportunity to interview John Harris about the book and his carer.

    Q. You have dedicated over 30 years to Sci-Fi. What attracted you into the genre, and what is it about Sci-Fi that has sustained your interest?

    A. The sense of a larger perspective, wider horizons, the unknown, something about the evolutionary possibilities of Man. All of that.

    Q. You often seem to combine of the fantastical with the plausible, incorporating building and mechanical structures that are familiar. Is this a conscious effort to make your worlds more believable?

    A. Yes, this is a crucial point, mixing the possible with the apparently impossible. We may pretend to know the difference but actually, we just don’t know what is possible. Embedding fantasy within the known and credible, makes it easier to relate to, and also raises the question ‘how?’. There is excitement there, in that question.

    Q. Born in London, you now live and work in Devon. How much do you think your environment influences your work?

    A. Yes, living in a rural setting has definitely shaped a lot of the imagery. The weather and the light that springs from it makes its presence felt in much of the work. And the cycle of growth and decay which is always in your face here, is constantly finding its way in.

    Q. Do you stick to a routine when producing your artwork?

    A. No, I try to break routines when I become aware of them. When I get into habits of production, I start repeating myself in the work.

    Q. How important is it for you that the final image matches the vision you have in your head?

    A. This is a delicate point. I do usually have a clear image in my head to begin with, but inevitably accidents occur (and I encourage these), which may suggest alternative directions. I try to keep open to them. But some images are imperative and demand to be produce, willy nilly.

    Q. At the Lounge our primary goal is to widen artists’ pool of inspiration. So who are the artist/illustrators that inspire you?

    A. Just about every artist I have ever seen, has something I would like to have. I think all artists are basically magpies and too many to mention have contributed to what I am.

    That said, when I was a student, I identified very closely with the work of the English Romantics like Turner and John Martin. They influenced my direction, as did the Surrealists. From a technical point of view, Whistler was a great teacher for me and more recently Graham Sutherland. All very Old School, I know.

    Q. Reading about your career, you have achieved a great deal. So what’s on the horizon for you? Do you have any artistic goals that you are still chasing?

    A. I feel (like most artist, I suspect) that I’ve hardly started. And yet, looking at the collection in this book, I see that I’m travelling in a definite direction. But what the goal is, who knows? That’s beyond the horizon.

  4. 3

    Jun 2014

    Antoine Carrion

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    Antoine Carrion is comic artist based in France. He has collaborated with authors Christian Lehmann to create No Pasaran and Antoine Ozanam on L’Ombre blanche. Partnering for a second time with Ozanam, they produced the successful one-shot, Temudjin. Illustrated entirely digitally, Temudjin tells a fantastical version of an adolescent Genghis Khan, guided by a shaman, on a journey to becoming the man history knows.

    Antoine Carrion’s artwork is consistently rousing and emotive. Beautiful use of thin line hatching give his work a very traditional feel. Not to mention how incredible his digital paintings are! You can find more of his work on his tumblr site (warning: some nudity).

  5. 26

    May 2014

    Man Arenas

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    Jacinto Manuel Arenas is Belgium born, but a citizen of Spain. He is a motion picture production designer, art director and a comic book creator. Mr. Arenas is a visual development artist for Walt Disney Animation Studio and has worked as production designer on the animated films Help! I’m a Fish (2000), Space Chimps (2008), The Gruffalo (2009).

    I was introduced to his work via his book Yaxin le faune Gabriel. Co-authored with Dimitri Vey, Yaxin is part comic and part poetry. His artwork, poetic in it’s execution, suites the fantasy fable perfectly.

    His personal tumblr is filled with sketches, and pictures of his process. I particularly love seeing his water-colour thumbnails.

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