Category: Educational
  1. 28

    Oct 2014

    Book Review ~ I’d Love To Draw

    by
    id-love-to-draw-01

    Editor’s Note:

    I’d Love to Draw is a collection of work by the innovative American artist Andrew Loomis, previously unseen by anyone outside the Loomis family and available in print for the first time ever. Having been held in the Loomis family archive for decades after the artist’s death, I’d Love to Draw has been restored by a group of devoted experts, including the globally renowned comic book artist and Loomis devotee Alex Ross.

    The Book Review:

    Last week we treated you with some special photos of the original I’d Love To Draw book. This week we shall regale you with our thoughts of the newly restored version.

    Andrew Loomis started this book with the ambitious intention of bridging the gap between those who “can’t draw” and hobbyist. Before he passed away, he completed much of the writing, annotations, and sketches. Though some of the sketches are quite rough, they more than convey their point. Alex Ross plays co-author, and adds extra annotation where needed. I initially though his part would be quite small, writing a forward and maybe some extra thoughts, but Mr Ross actually has annotations throughout which are very helpful.

    An important thing to remember is that this book is aimed at the absolute novice and so Mr Loomis pays careful attention to limit the art terminology, and breaks down processes to their simplest. Mr Loomis’ main focus is to change how a beginner thinks about drawing. He States that an amateur will focus on the contours of an object and attempt to draw them. This is of course very difficult even for seasoned illustrators. He goes into great depth to explain the importance of construction lines, and breaking down an object to its most basic shapes. Mr Loomis proceeds comfortably to reinforce this idea with a few examples of complex objects with their basic shape counterpart. The book is filled with some great tidbits, like this gem:

    “We can only fake things we know thoroughly—otherwise we just put down the evidence of what we do not know.”

    After addressing preconceptions and hopefully easing some of any initial fear, Mr Loomis proceeds to explain some of the most central areas of illustration including perspective, light, faces and figures. He spotlights cartooning and exaggeration, in attempt to convey the fun of drawing. Which actually did just that. I found it a really welcome section after the more technical information. The book concludes with different techniques of sketching: tonal, accent, scribble, block and more. This was definitely my favourite section as it pretty much doubles as a showcase of how inspiring and adept Andrew Loomis’ sketches are.

    In all, I’d Love to Draw, is a worthy addition to the Loomis book collection and it is wonderful to see more of his work in print. I should stress that it won’t suit everyone. For those who already have a foot in illustration and draw regularly, this book may be a tad repetitious. Essentially it is a more accessible version of Successful Drawing. However, what it does do well and what it set out to do, to relieve the fear of having a go.

    I will admit I have not sat to draw much lately, but as soon as I put this book down I picked my pencil up. Something about the “Getting the fun out of it” section really motivated me.

    Published by Titan Books, I’d Love To Draw is out now, retailing at £29.99. I would recommend it mainly for beginners, those interested in illustration (and willing to give it a go), and definitely the Loomis enthusiast.

    I’d Love To Draw
    Titan
    Hardback with dust jacket
    128 pages
    306 x 234mm
  2. 17

    Oct 2014

    I’d Love To Draw by Andrew Loomis

    by
    id-love-to-draw-01 id-love-to-draw-02 id-love-to-draw-03 id-love-to-draw-04 id-love-to-draw-05 id-love-to-draw-06 id-love-to-draw-07 id-love-to-draw-08

    I’d Love To Draw is out today in the UK! To celebrate Titan books have kindly sent over some rare photographs of the original book Andrew Loomis created.

    I’d Love To Draw was started by the Andrew Loomis, but he unfortunately died in 1959 before its completion. Held in the Loomis family archives for decades, the book’s existence was entirely unknown outside of the Loomis family – until now. Lovingly restored by a team of experts, including the globally-renowned and respected artist Alex Ross, Titan Books are finally publishing Loomis’ lost legacy. This facsimile edition finally completes the Loomis legacy at long last.

    We will have a full review of the book soon.

  3. 24

    Jul 2014

    Really Cheap and Really Useful Books for Illustrators

    by
    penny-books-01 penny-books-02 penny-books-03

    We are going to do something a little different for today’s post. I recently picked up a copy of The Anatomy of Costume from Amazon for the enthralling price of 1 pence. A perfectly good book, in a perfectly acceptable condition. This got me thinking, how great it would if there were a whole list of useful art books that were being sold for a penny? I did a little Google-fu to see what was out there already, after not finding anything I decided to make my own list and share it with you, my fellow Loungers.

    This list of 30 books breaks down into four main categories, Reference, Tutorial, Fine Art and Other. I specifically chose books from a broad range of creative fields and would have loved to throw in a couple books on design or architecture, but sadly could not find anything worthy for so cheep.

    Just in case some of you are thinking, what is the point of buying a book when you have a wealth of reference of the internet? Firstly, as shocking as it may seem, not everything is on the internet; sometimes that dissected image of that flower you need can only be found in a book. Personally, I prefer working with a book in front of me rather than a screen. Ultimately buying books will introduce you to things you weren’t looking for, which is the best way to expand your pool of inspiration. Not to mention, these books are a penny, you cheapskate!

    I should mention that I own a lot of the books in this list, most of which I spent a lot more than a penny to buy. Suffice to say their value is much higher than their price tag.

    Enough rambling, here is the list:

    Reference

    General

    Costume

    History

    Tutorial

    Fine Art

    General

    Artist

    Other

  4. 18

    Jul 2014

    M. Sasek (1916 – 1980)

    by
    m-sasek-01 m-sasek-02 m-sasek-03 m-sasek-04 m-sasek-05 m-sasek-06

    Born 16th November 1916, Miroslav Sasek grew up in Prague. After finishing school he wanted to study to become a painter, but his parents were disapproving, so to appease them he decided to studied architecture instead. He did however study drawing and painting with Czech landscape artist Otakar Blažíček, and later in 1947 moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux Arts. Just at the onset of his illustration career, prompted by the 1948 Czech coup, Mr Sasek decided not to return to his homeland and instead emigrate to Munich.

    Whilst earning a living as a graphic artist in advertising and architecture, Mr Sasek paid a visit to Paris, where it suddenly dawned upon him that there were not any books written for children to learn about their city. So in 1957 he created a children’s guide book to Paris, titled This is Paris. In doing so, he began what would become his life’s work. Following the success of This is Paris he went on to produce books on London (1959), Rome (1960), New York (1960) and many others. In total Mr Sasek produced 18 books in the series, with plans of others including Bombay and Canada. Sadly, in 1980 he died while visiting his sister in Switzerland, leaving those plans unrealised.

    The quality of the illustrations, and the success of the series earned Mr Sasek multiple awards over the years, including New York Times Best Illustrated Books of the Year (twice), Society of Illustrators Award for Excellence, and an entry in the International Board on Books for Young People Honour List.

    Obviously the best place to see more of M. Sasek’s work is by picking up one (or more) of his This Is… books, but you can also find further information on the Miroslav Sasek Foundation website, and this great little fan website.

  5. 3

    Mar 2014

    Sebastian Ramn

    by
    sebastian-ramn-01 sebastian-ramn-02 sebastian-ramn-03 sebastian-ramn-04 sebastian-ramn-05

    Sebastian Ramn is a freelance Art Director and Illustrator, operating out of Stockholm. His work ranges from editorial illustration to TV Network identities, animated shorts and graphic novels.

    Mr. Ramn’s recently established a new website to plays host to much of his current work, but with the key aim of providing in-depth background on his process and reasoning. His finely written article are definitely worth a read, you can start with Omission in storytelling.

Back to Top