Category: Editorial
  1. 20

    Apr 2015

    Victo Ngai

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    Victo Ngai is not short of accolades, having won two gold medals from the Society of Illustrators, as well as being featured on the prestigious Forbes 2014 30 under 30: Art & Style list.

    Born in Hong Kong, Ngai graduated from Rhode Island School of Design and works primarily as an editorial illustrator. Now based in New York, she has illustrated for newspapers, magazines, books and advertising campaigns. Ngai’s client list is incredible, previously working with the likes of New York Times and the New Yorker, IMAX, Folio Society, Somerest House London, Lufthansa Airline and General Electric.

    Victo Ngai’s style, though it does vary quite a bit, is often intricate and rhythmic. Incorporating pattern and repetition, many of her pieces remind me of Medieval and Japanese tapestries. I really love her colours choices for the outline of the main figures. It does a wonderful job of distinguishing the figure, whilst at the same time, unifying it with an often complex background.

    Hop over to her website for more work. Whilst there, do not forget to watch her short interviews with Like Knows Like and Forge Magazine.

  2. 31

    Mar 2015

    Michelle Woodward

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    Michelle Woodward is a Sheridan College graduate born and raised in Southern Ontario. She works as a freelance illustrator with clients including Creative Quarterly, McGraw-HIll Ryerson, Canadian Running Magazine, and Dirt Rag Magazine. Many of Woodward’s illustrations have a feeling of trepidation or unease, which she creates with great use of desaturated tones and lone figures.

    You can find more of Michelle Woodward’s work on her website and Society6.

  3. 27

    Mar 2015

    Fashion Fridays ~ Irene Kold

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    Living in Copenhagen, Irene Kold is an illustrator specialising in fashion illustration, print and surface design. Graduating in 2006 from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Kold became a freelancer in 2010. Many of her clients are within the fashion and lifestyle industry, including Vila, Kokoon, Envii, and Journalisten. She is also represented by Anna Goodson Management, putting her amongst very good company.

    Footloose and unconstrained, Kold works with various materials to create expressive illustrations. Her handmade look is accentuated by using very relaxed and unfinished lines, splashes of colour and pattern. Kold’s typography is equally dramatic, complimenting her illustration perfectly.

    You can find much more of Irene Kold’s illustrations on her website.

  4. 17

    Mar 2015

    Tonči Zonjić

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    Croatian illustrators Tonči Zonjić (pronouced TAWN-chih ZAWN-yitch) has been called “a master of cinematic comics”, which, I am inclined to agree with.

    Zonjić was born in 1986, originally studied Math at the Natural Sciences High School, with the intentions of going into Computer Programming. Then one fateful day the wonderful word of art took hold of him. Originally Zonjić studied Graphic Design, but found it was not a good fit for him due to a desire to draw more, so after a year he switched gears and joined the Fine Arts Academy to study Animation. Though happier there, the course did not sustain him and Zonjić dropped out after two years to become a freelance illustrator.

    During his time as a freelancer Zonjić worked on storyboards, advertisements, book covers, and had a weekly newspaper slot drawing portraits. He dipped his feet into comic via Darko Macan’s fanzine Q strip.

    Working as a freelancer, and having the chance to grow as a comic artist through shorter strips, Zonjić became very comfortable handling all parts of the comic process from story to pencils, inks, color and letters. So when he entered the American comic world with Marvel’s The Immortal Iron Fist series by Ed Brubaker and Matt Fraction, he was already exhibiting confident clear storytelling. Since then he has worked on both Marvel and DC titles, Mike Allred’s Madman, Mike Mignola’s Lobster Johnson and Ales Kot’s Zero.

    2011 saw the release of his collaboration with writer Nathan Edmondson, Who Is Jake Ellis? The spy thriller, entirely drawn and coloured by Zonjić, really allows him to explore a more cinematic approach to storytelling. Using colour heavily to help differentiate scenes, reminiscent of 100 Bullets. In the follow-up, Where is Jake Ellis? Zonjić just blows it out of the water. Everything is tightened, from the design and layouts to the pacing, and showing much more confident as a colourist. With the fifth and final issue of Where is Jake Ellis? yet to be released with no annonuced release date, the complete trade paperback however, is set for release in July 2015.

    Other than picking up the Jake Ellis comics, which you really should do, you can also see more of Tonči Zonjić’s work on his website and blog.

  5. 12

    Mar 2015

    Andreas Bennwik

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    Swedish freelance illustrator, Andreas Bennwik, has worked with a plethora of large brands including Volkswagen, Micheline, Audi, EMI, McDonalds and Paradox Interactive. He has produced illustrations for advertising, packaging, video games and book covers. Some of his book cover highlights including Nancy Drew, Famous Five and The Hardy Boys.

    With such a large body of work, it may amuse you to know, I actually stumbled on his work after seeing a piece he is working for the upcoming film, Kung Fury. I cannot wait to see the finished poster, and the film for that matter.

    His realistic renditions allow for some wonderful juxtapositions and satire. This is explored particularly in his editorial work. Some of Bennwik’s illustrations are rendered so well, that you have to double take, making sure it’s not a photograph you are looking at.

    To see more of Andreas Bennwik’s work head over to his website.

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