Category: Editorial
  1. 22

    Aug 2014

    Conrad Roset

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    I cannot overemphasise how beautiful Conrad Roset’s illustrations are. I am particularly besotted with his work for the children’s book Ensueños. Mr Roset is from Terrassa, Spain and studied at the Joso School and at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Barcelona. Straight out of university, his online portfolio caught the attention retailers Zara. Working there for a year he developed his style and took the opportunity to learn from other illustrators.

    After Zara, Mr Roset was confident to start a freelance career and, has had many triumphs working for different brands, agencies, and publishing companies. Some of his notable clients include Adidas, Coca Cola, Disney, Mulberry, Laurence King, Random House Mondadori and Wieden+Kennedy. On top of his freelancing successes he also shares his knowledge teaching illustration at the School of Design BAU.

    To see more of Conrad Roset’s exquisite artwork pop over to his website.

  2. 21

    Aug 2014

    Hanna K

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    Hanna K Nyström is freelance illustrator from Stockholm, Sweden. She studied traditional animation at Fellingsbro Folk High School, and is currently working on a comic book space saga titled Newest Frontier. She has already completed and released the first part, Third Wheel.

    Hanna K is also part of the Peow Studio collective along with previously featured Elliot Alfredius. Though she does work digitally, she predominately uses watercolours and inks to illustrate her wide-eyed, offbeat characters.

    You can find more of Hanna K’s work on tumblr and deviantArt.

  3. 19

    Aug 2014

    Cleon Peterson

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    Cleon Peterson is an LA based artist. His stark paintings depict a constant chaotic power struggle between broods of grotesque figures. In a bitter irony his dystopian landscapes have law breakers and law enforcers on equal footing, putting personal entitlement above morals.

    Mr Peterson’s work has been exhibited across America, Europe and Australia. His art is regularly featured in magazines, it graces walls, and the cover of Philip K Dick’s novel, The Man in the High Castle.

    You can see more of Mr Peterson’s artwork on his website. Yes, it is violent and on the unsettling side, you have been warned.

  4. 15

    Aug 2014

    Paul Rand (1914 – 1996)

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    Paul Rand was an American graphic designer, and would have been 100 years old today. Best know for his corporate identity designs. Some of his well famous logo designs include IBM, UPS, Enron, Westinghouse, and ABC.

    Mr Rand pulled inspiration from multiple field including art, design, architecture, literature, and philosophy. By having such a vast pool of thought, by experimenting, and by confidently not being original, the work he produced was considered ground-breaking. He also understood the importance of humour in his work, the easiest way to make a client happy is to make them smile.

    Mr Rand’s work and words still resonate today. A brilliant place to find both is paul-rand.com. I will leave you with a couple of Mr Rand’s quotes, as one is just never enough.

    “Providing, meaning to a mass of unrelated needs, ideas, words and pictures – it is the designer’s job to select and fit this material together and make it interesting.”

    “Without aesthetic, design is either the humdrum repetition of familiar clichés or a wild scramble for novelty. Without the aesthetic, the computer is but a mindless speed machine, producing effects without substance. Form without relevant content, or content without meaningful form.”

    Happy birthday and thank you, Mr Rand.

  5. 12

    Aug 2014

    Charles Dana Gibson (1867 – 1944)

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    Today’s dose of inspiration is from the acclaimed American illustrator, Charles Dana Gibson, whom is best known for his emblematic creation The Gibson Girl.

    1867, baby Gibson is born to a creative and wealthy family. A head-start that an ambitious young Gibson would use as a springboard. At the age of eight, after watching his father, he started cutting silhouettes and by twelve he was selling them. By his mid-teens, after dabbling with sculpture under the guise of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, he picked up a penchant for pen and ink.

    Soon after he enrolled in an Art Students League, but had to leave at the age of eighteen due to family financial troubles. Out of school and looking for work, Mr Gibson ventured unsuccessfully to get a job. However, in 1886 he managed to sell one of his illustrations to LIFE magazine. A then newly established magazine, attempting to compete with the likes of Puck and Judge.

    The public took a strong liking to Mr Gibson’s satirical portrayal of high society. So as his popularity rose, so to did his importance to the magazine. Going from a salary of $33 to $185 in just three months. Obviously with such popularity Mr Gibson was soon approached by other magazines including Scribner’s, Century, Harper’s, and Time (then named Tid-Bits).

    In 1890, he started drawing The Gibson Girl. With only a slim argument to the contrary, it is widely accepted his wife, Irene Langhorne Gibson was the basis and model for her. The Gibson Girl’s importance as a public figure cannot be slighted. The youthful Gibson Girl was the visual embodiment of a new feminine ideal, described at the time as the “New Woman”. She was confident and glamorous, from her creation up until World War I, she set the standard for fashion and decorum.

    The success of Mr Gibson’s girl was phenomenal, his demand and fees were so great that at the height of his career his annual salary had reached $75,000. In 1904 he had even signed a four-year contract with Condé Nast to produce 100 illustrations for the sum of $100,000.

    On top of his own personal illustrative successes Mr Gibson founded the Society of Illustrators. He helped the war effort by assembling a group of illustrators (including James Montgomery Flagg, J.C. Leyendecker, and Howard Chandler Christy) to set up The Division of Pictorial Publicity whom produced all those famous wonderful and patriotic posters. He, along with some other illustrators, writers, and staff members bought LIFE magazine.

    In his retirement he finally put down the pen and ink and picked up oil painting. In 1944, at the age of 77, suffered a heart attack and died a few weeks later.

    Charles Dana Gibson’s importance and impact, though praised at the time, nowadays does not get the attention it duly deserves. His skills along with his tenacity were, and probably still are, unrivaled. You would be hard pressed to think of an another illustrator whom has had equal cultural and financial success. To see more of Mr Gibson’s work I strongly suggest picking up a copy of The Gibson Girl and Her America.

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