Category: Editorial
  1. 11

    Apr 2014

    Harold Nelson (1871 – 1948)

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    Born in 1871 Dorchester, England, Harold Edward Hughes Nelson is probably best known for his heraldic style and postage stamps designs. He studied at both the Lambeth School of Art and the Central School of Arts and Design. He was a prolific man working as an artist, illustrator, etcher, engraver, designer and lecturer. Illustrating postage stamps, advertisements, magazines, books and bookplates. One of his many notable achievements is illustrating the novel, A Real Queen’s Fairy Tales, authored by the Queen of Romania.

    Mr. Nelson was strongly influenced by the styles of the times. During the early 1900s his work incorporated Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau elements. Then by the 1930s his work embodied the Art Deco ethos. This only made is work stronger allowing him to choose from variety styles that would best suit the content.

    Sadly there isn’t heaps of information online about Harold Nelson, but to find out a little more you can check out Wikipedia, The Pictorial Arts, and The British Postal Museum.

  2. 13

    Mar 2014

    Gemma Correll

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    Gemma Correll is a UK based illustrator, know for her guileless style. A style that has garnered her over 236,000 followers on facebook, and clients including Hallmark, The New York Times, Chronicle Books and The Observer. Correll has also published four books to date, her latest being, A Pug’s Guide to Dating.

    Though her style does come under criticism, combining mature subject matters with crude drawings is a tried-and-true technique. One of the most famous and shining examples of this is Maus by Art Spiegelman. Another interesting element of Correll’s style is her regular use of just three colours; black, white and red. A very powerful colour scheme, with strong cultural meaning, that is more often used in design. So yes, Correll’s illustrations can be mistaken as childish, but then that would disregard the maturity and intuition involved to produce them.

    You can find more of Correll’s work on her website, and don’t forget to check out her Daily Diaries.

  3. 10

    Mar 2014

    Adrian Tomine

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    Presenting the very distinctive work of Adrian Tomine. Born in 1974, California, Mr. Tomine started creating and publishing comics whilst he was still in his teens. He distributed his self-published mini-comic, Optic Nerve, to the local comics shops. Nowadays Drawn and Quarterly have taken over Mr. Tomine’s publishing and distribution, leaving him more time to create comics and The New Yorker covers.

    Adrian Tomine style combines clear line work with solid colour and little to no texture. There is a beautiful stillness to his illustrations; harmonious pallet, balanced composition, often eye-level. Tomine’s illustrations feel personal, as if they are family snapshots, which I find especially true of his cover work.

    Be sure to check out more of his work on his website.

  4. 7

    Mar 2014

    Eleanor Davis

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    Eleanor Davis is an award-winning illustrator and a talented storyteller. She has two graphic novels under her belt, The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, Stinky, with a third, titled How to Be Happy, set for release this year.

    Consistently producing both clients and personal work, Davis’ work is nothing less than exquisite. I am besotted by its sensitivity. Her storytelling devices and illustration style adapt to the story she is telling, but the results are always equally fulfilling. You can see some of her short comics here. Also, take the time to check our Davis’ sketchblog, seeing all her doodle and ideas is a real feast for the senses.

  5. 4

    Mar 2014

    Kyle Smart

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    Presenting Kyle Smart. Part-time tutor at Bristol UWE, member of the Drawn In Bristol collective, and full time freelance Illustrator. Predominately working in editorial illustration, he creates images for magazines and book covers. Some of his previous clients include Variety Magazine, Readers Digest, NoBrow Press, The Wall Street Journal, and Computer Arts.

    Mr. Smart’s illustrations have humour and energy. His colour palettes are muted and harmonious. His technique seems predominately traditional, but with gentle digital touch. All combined create a very impressive and enjoyable portfolio to thumb though, which you can check out here.

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