1. Wilhelm M. Busch (1908 – 1987)

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    William Martin Busch was born in Breslau, Germany. His father was a painter and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw. During Mr. Busch’s professional life he jumped from decorative painter to press illustrator, freelancing as artist, then sharing his wisdom as a teacher. Not least, amidst it all, illustrating over 300 books. Duly earning recognition and the distinguished Edwin Scharff Prize.

    Mr. Busch’s style ranges from meticulous and realistic renders, to loose and speedy sketches. Of which his entire gamut is equally enchanting. Personally, I am besotted by Mr. Busch’s more relaxed linework. He could capture the essence and gesture of a moment at a level that is rarely achieved.

    There are a couple of great websites that feature a ton of Wilhelm M. Busch’s work, head to Hans Bacher’s blog and Deja View.

  2. John Stanley (1914 – 1993)

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    Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame Inductee, John Stanley, is best known for rendition of comic Little Lulu.

    Beginning his artistic journey In the 1930s, illustrating for the Fleischer animation studios, Mr. Stanley went on to freelance for the Western Printing Company. During this period he created stories for many much-loved characters including Bugs Bunny, Andy Panda, and Woody Woodpecker.

    One day, mid 1940s, Oscar Lebeck approached John Stanley to produce a bi-monthly series of Marjorie Henderson Buell’s Lulu Moppett character. Mr. Stanley stuck to scripting duties for the most part, but did draw many of the early issues, and would produce a storyboard sketch for artist’s Irving Tripp and Charles Hedinger to work from.

    Modestly shrugging off being selected for the Little Lulu comic as “chance”, other illustrators are not so coy about singing his prises.

    Fred Hembeck hailed John Stanley as,

    “The most consistently funny cartoonist to work in the comic book medium”.

    and C.C. Beck said,

    “The only comic books I ever read and enjoyed were Little Lulu and Donald Duck.”

    A great place to find out more about John Stanley and his contribution to the comic industry is the blog, Stanley Stories.

  3. A Beautiful Customizable Children’s Book

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    I am by no means the first to write about this incredible book, but I recently ordered a couple for my son and niece, so I thought I’d now spread the word seeing as I now have them in my hands.

    The deal is this: for £18.99 (including free worldwide shipping might I add), you get a perfect bound, personalised children’s book with a story centred around your child’s name. Simply visit LostMy.Name and type in your child’s name and then select ‘boy’ or ‘girl’. You can preview the whole book online, which is great. The entire website experience is great.

    These guys seem to have gotten everything right, from the story by David Cadji-Newby to the truly beautiful and stylish illustrations by Pedro Serapicos. The books are perfect bound on some nice matt stock, too. I’ll also add that the customer service was really helpful (I shamefully mis-spelled my niece’s name, but they were very friendly put it right for me).

    I cannot recommend this enough; it’ll make the perfect gift and for a price that doesn’t break the bank.

  4. G. Grossman

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    Firstly, we would like to wish all our fellow Loungers a Happy New Year and hope you had a cheerful festive break. We would also like to take this opportunity to remind you that we are looking for Guest Authors. If you are a knowledgeable illustration-enthusiast, write well, and want to share your passion on the Lounge for all to read, please contact us. We would love to get back to posting daily by expanding the Illustrator’s Lounge team and can not do it without your help.

    Now, with the formalities out of the way, let me introduce you to today’s feature, G. Grossman. If you are anything like me and wondering what the “G” stands for, I used all the Google-Fu I know but still could not find out for you, so sadly that will have to remain a mystery. However, though the forename is unsaid, G. Grossman has been rather vocal about their process answering a cross-section of questions. I positively appreciate the variety of time-honoured mediums Grossman uses, particular the watercolour/colour pencil combination. It is also nice to know Grossman’s skill as a traditional illustrator does not deter from taking pieces to the computer to add that little bit extra. To see more of G. Grossman’s work please check out the GG Makes Art website, and tumblr.

  5. Toerning

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    I recently stumbled on the wonderful work of Toerning through one of her few, but very useful, tutorials. Her tutorials are filled with tips about lighting, perspective, composition and colour, and well worth a gander.

    Often working with traditional mediums such as ink, acrylics or gouache. Toerning’s knowledge of lighting and colour really stands out. And her marrying of both traditional and digital processes create some stunning results, as seen in her Selkie pieces.

    To see more of Toerning’s work, check out her DeviantArt and Tumblr.

  6. Gene Luen Yang

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    Multiple Eisner award winner, writer/illustrator, Gene Luen Yang began his career self-publishing his comic books under the name Humble Comics in 1996. He went on to write and draw a host of books including Animal Crackers, Prime Baby, American Born Chinese. The latter was released by First Second Books in 2006 and became the first graphic novel to be nominated for a National Book Award and the first to win the American Library Association’s Printz Award.

    Mr. Yang is also the writer of Dark Horse’s comic series the Avatar: The Last Airbender. Very recently First Second Books released his two-volume graphic novel project, Boxers & Saints.

    Not long ago I watched a wonderful talk Gene Luen Yang gave at Penn State University, where he champions the comic medium, and discusses his thoughts and process behind some of his work. If you have a spare 60 minutes, it’s definitely worth the watch.