1. Brandon James Scott

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    The Loungers have all been long-time fans of Brandon James Scott’s work. It has it all; consideration, charisma, humour, and longevity. It combines rough textures with lush and harmonious colours.

    On top of his illustrator hat, Mr. Scott he has also worn Art Director, Director, Designer and Writer. Working across an array of fields with a range of clients including JibJab Media, Mattel Entertainment, Ogilvy & Mather, Disney, and Nickelodeon. Mr. Scott is also the creator and art director of the Emmy-nominated Justin Time.

    Clearly hard-working, Mr. Scott has also written and illustrated two children’s books as well as co-illustrating the The Longest Christmas List Ever, alongside JibJab founder Evan Spiridellis.

    You can find more of Mr. Scott’s wonderful work on his website.

  2. Eleanor Davis

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    Eleanor Davis is an award-winning illustrator and a talented storyteller. She has two graphic novels under her belt, The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, Stinky, with a third, titled How to Be Happy, set for release this year.

    Consistently producing both clients and personal work, Davis’ work is nothing less than exquisite. I am besotted by its sensitivity. Her storytelling devices and illustration style adapt to the story she is telling, but the results are always equally fulfilling. You can see some of her short comics here. Also, take the time to check our Davis’ sketchblog, seeing all her doodle and ideas is a real feast for the senses.

  3. Vera Brosgol

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    Storyboard and comic artist Vera Brosgol was born in Moscow, but has lived in the United States since the age of five. She contributed to 3 volumes the Flight anthologies and gained broad recognition with her first graphic novel, Anya’s Ghost. Published in 2011 by First Second Books, it won Brosgol an Will Eisner award in Best Publication for Teens.

    You can check out more of Vera Brosgol’s work on her website. She has not updated her blog in a short while, but you can have plenty of fun sieving through the archive, where you can find posts like this, about her process.

  4. Tom Fowler

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    Continuing our unsolicited Canadian courtship I present to you Thomas W. H. Fowler. Hailing from Ottawa (Canada), and kicking around the comic circuit for a number of years, his previous published works include Revolution on the Planet of the Apes, Venom, Green Arrow, Grendel, Star Wars: Jango Fett and Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight. Not forgetting he was also a regular contributor to Comic Twart.

    Mr. Fowler is magnificent with inks and a brush. I particularly revel seeing his scans before the lines are made a solid black, as he consciously uses a variety of hues. You can find more of Mr. Fowler’s work on his blog, BLARG!

  5. Geneviève Godbout

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    Genevieve Godbout is a children’s book and fashion illustrator based in London. Originally from Quebec, she studied animation in Montreal, then at the prestigious Gobelins in Paris. Godbout has worked with the likes of Disney, les editions Milan, and La Pastèque.

    Godbout’s soft pointillistic style is used to create tranquil scenes, vast in colour but never over-whelming. A perfect combination for children’s books.

    You can see more of her work on her blog, Rose-a-Petits-Pois.

  6. Wilhelm M. Busch (1908 – 1987)

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    William Martin Busch was born in Breslau, Germany. His father was a painter and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw. During Mr. Busch’s professional life he jumped from decorative painter to press illustrator, freelancing as artist, then sharing his wisdom as a teacher. Not least, amidst it all, illustrating over 300 books. Duly earning recognition and the distinguished Edwin Scharff Prize.

    Mr. Busch’s style ranges from meticulous and realistic renders, to loose and speedy sketches. Of which his entire gamut is equally enchanting. Personally, I am besotted by Mr. Busch’s more relaxed linework. He could capture the essence and gesture of a moment at a level that is rarely achieved.

    There are a couple of great websites that feature a ton of Wilhelm M. Busch’s work, head to Hans Bacher’s blog and Deja View.

  7. John Stanley (1914 – 1993)

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    Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame Inductee, John Stanley, is best known for rendition of comic Little Lulu.

    Beginning his artistic journey In the 1930s, illustrating for the Fleischer animation studios, Mr. Stanley went on to freelance for the Western Printing Company. During this period he created stories for many much-loved characters including Bugs Bunny, Andy Panda, and Woody Woodpecker.

    One day, mid 1940s, Oscar Lebeck approached John Stanley to produce a bi-monthly series of Marjorie Henderson Buell’s Lulu Moppett character. Mr. Stanley stuck to scripting duties for the most part, but did draw many of the early issues, and would produce a storyboard sketch for artist’s Irving Tripp and Charles Hedinger to work from.

    Modestly shrugging off being selected for the Little Lulu comic as “chance”, other illustrators are not so coy about singing his prises.

    Fred Hembeck hailed John Stanley as,

    “The most consistently funny cartoonist to work in the comic book medium”.

    and C.C. Beck said,

    “The only comic books I ever read and enjoyed were Little Lulu and Donald Duck.”

    A great place to find out more about John Stanley and his contribution to the comic industry is the blog, Stanley Stories.