Category: Children’s Books
  1. 22

    Aug 2014

    Conrad Roset

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    I cannot overemphasise how beautiful Conrad Roset’s illustrations are. I am particularly besotted with his work for the children’s book Ensueños. Mr Roset is from Terrassa, Spain and studied at the Joso School and at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Barcelona. Straight out of university, his online portfolio caught the attention retailers Zara. Working there for a year he developed his style and took the opportunity to learn from other illustrators.

    After Zara, Mr Roset was confident to start a freelance career and, has had many triumphs working for different brands, agencies, and publishing companies. Some of his notable clients include Adidas, Coca Cola, Disney, Mulberry, Laurence King, Random House Mondadori and Wieden+Kennedy. On top of his freelancing successes he also shares his knowledge teaching illustration at the School of Design BAU.

    To see more of Conrad Roset’s exquisite artwork pop over to his website.

  2. 15

    Aug 2014

    Paul Rand (1914 – 1996)

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    Paul Rand was an American graphic designer, and would have been 100 years old today. Best know for his corporate identity designs. Some of his well famous logo designs include IBM, UPS, Enron, Westinghouse, and ABC.

    Mr Rand pulled inspiration from multiple field including art, design, architecture, literature, and philosophy. By having such a vast pool of thought, by experimenting, and by confidently not being original, the work he produced was considered ground-breaking. He also understood the importance of humour in his work, the easiest way to make a client happy is to make them smile.

    Mr Rand’s work and words still resonate today. A brilliant place to find both is paul-rand.com. I will leave you with a couple of Mr Rand’s quotes, as one is just never enough.

    “Providing, meaning to a mass of unrelated needs, ideas, words and pictures – it is the designer’s job to select and fit this material together and make it interesting.”

    “Without aesthetic, design is either the humdrum repetition of familiar clichés or a wild scramble for novelty. Without the aesthetic, the computer is but a mindless speed machine, producing effects without substance. Form without relevant content, or content without meaningful form.”

    Happy birthday and thank you, Mr Rand.

  3. 14

    Aug 2014

    Aurore Damant

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    Aurore Damant is an illustrator whom all of us at the Lounge have been long-time fans of. Her illustrations are spirited and humorous. They combine flowing shapes with a harmonious pastel pallet. Importantly, even though simplified, her characters are distinct and their emotions bountiful.

    Based in Paris, she is a Gobelins animation graduate, now working as a character designer, art director and freelance illustrator. Collaborating with top animation companies including Disney, Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network and The Illuminated Film, Ms Damant has helped develop TV shows Gravity Falls, Robotboy, Eliot Kid, and Commander Clark. She is constantly writting and illustrating children’s books, to date some of the titles including Un Ukulélé Pour Junior, Un Métier Pour Maurice and four volumes of The Haunted Library.

    To find out more about Aurore Damant check out this insightful interview she did for the Character Design blog. To see more of her work, check out her blogspot.

  4. 18

    Jul 2014

    M. Sasek (1916 – 1980)

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    Born 16th November 1916, Miroslav Sasek grew up in Prague. After finishing school he wanted to study to become a painter, but his parents were disapproving, so to appease them he decided to studied architecture instead. He did however study drawing and painting with Czech landscape artist Otakar Blažíček, and later in 1947 moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux Arts. Just at the onset of his illustration career, prompted by the 1948 Czech coup, Mr Sasek decided not to return to his homeland and instead emigrate to Munich.

    Whilst earning a living as a graphic artist in advertising and architecture, Mr Sasek paid a visit to Paris, where it suddenly dawned upon him that there were not any books written for children to learn about their city. So in 1957 he created a children’s guide book to Paris, titled This is Paris. In doing so, he began what would become his life’s work. Following the success of This is Paris he went on to produce books on London (1959), Rome (1960), New York (1960) and many others. In total Mr Sasek produced 18 books in the series, with plans of others including Bombay and Canada. Sadly, in 1980 he died while visiting his sister in Switzerland, leaving those plans unrealised.

    The quality of the illustrations, and the success of the series earned Mr Sasek multiple awards over the years, including New York Times Best Illustrated Books of the Year (twice), Society of Illustrators Award for Excellence, and an entry in the International Board on Books for Young People Honour List.

    Obviously the best place to see more of M. Sasek’s work is by picking up one (or more) of his This Is… books, but you can also find further information on the Miroslav Sasek Foundation website, and this great little fan website.

  5. 15

    Jul 2014

    Mary Lundquist

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    Mary Lundquist is an illustrator based in Los Angeles. She graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and is currently working on several children’s books. I assume, one at least, will be based on her character Bunny, whom can be spotted throughout her portfolio. Mrs Lundquist’s style utilise her soft pencil work by adding a simple wash of watercolours, giving her illustrations a real tranquil feeling.

    You can see more of Mary Lundquist’s work on her website.

    A quick thanks goes to our avid Lounge reader, Nicholas, whom bought Mrs Lundquist’ work to our attention. If you have a personal project, or have seen inspiring illustrator you want to shout about, you can email your suggestions to us via our contact page.

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