Category: Children’s Books
  1. 16

    Oct 2014

    Mike Yamada

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    Mike Yamada is a visual development artist for animation, and concept artist for video games. Some of his feature animation work includes Big Hero 6 (2014), How to Train your Dragon (2010), Monsters vs. Aliens (2009), and Kung Fu Panda (2008).

    Alongside his wife, Victoria Ying, he started a design studio called Extracurricular Activities. It houses their beautiful products, such as prints and apparel. They also take their knowledge on the road, holding lectures and workshops. Talking about knowledge, this excellent interview of the couple has back-back great advice any aspiring artist.

    A couple years ago, the pair took to Kickstarter to fund their ambitious children’s book Curiosities: An Illustrated History of Ancestral Oddity. As you can imagine it absolute bulldozed its original goal of $4,000 and went on to receive just under $50,000!

    Mike Yamada’s blog is filled with his concept art and sketches and well worth a gander.

  2. 18

    Sep 2014

    Lydia Nichols

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    Philadelphia-based Lydia Nichols is a illustrator, typographer, designer, and teacher (and anthropomorphizer). After an intern at Pixar, Ms Nichols started freelancing. Some of her notable clients including Bloomberg Businessweek, Chronicle Books, Google UK and MailChimp. She has also taught at MICA and Moore, as well a providing a class for Skillshare.

    Squeezing the best out of illustrator and photoshop, Ms Nichols’ work is both lucid and tactile. Her illustrations are clear, sprightly and guaranteed to put a smile on your face, if not, just a simper. Child-friendly too, her illustrations use subdued colour and have a Mary Blair/UPA charm to them.

    See more of Lydia Nichols’ on her website and Dribbble page.

  3. 11

    Sep 2014

    Ben Fiquet

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    Born in France, Ben Fiquet is an animator and illustrator for video games and comics. My first introduction to Mr Fiquet’s work was the 2006 short animation he, and his fellow Gobelins students, produced for the Annecy Festival called Pyrats. It is one of my favorite Gobelins animations to date, and I remember at the time of seeing it hoping it would become a series. I’m secretly still holding out for that one.

    Equally adept in character and environment design, Mr Fiquet puts that to good use in his comic work. Titles include Les chevaliers de la Chouette and four volumes of Powa. More recent he contributed to the star-studded, and much anticipated, Kickstarter project Masters of Anatomy.

    Hope over to Ben Fiquet’s website see more of his work.

  4. 28

    Aug 2014

    Josh Cooley

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    Josh Cooley is a story artist and director (and Professional Hunk) based in California. As an employee of the prestigious Pixar Animation Studios, Mr Cooley has worked as a storyboard artist on some of your favourites, including The Incredibles (2004), Ratatouille (2007), and Up (2009).

    In his spare times he creates children-book-inspired prints based on famous films. A collection of them have been collected and bound into the hardcoved bundle of joy, titled Movies R Fun!.

    To see more of Josh Cooley’s Movies R Fun prints, check out his bigcartel shop, and find more of his work on his blogspot.

  5. 26

    Aug 2014

    Scott C.

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    Scott Campbell, better known as Scott C., is an American artist and production designer. Mr C. began his career at LucasArts as concept artist, then went on to join Double Fine Productions as Art Director.

    In his spare time he paints, illustrates children’s book and also makes comics. His paintings have been showcase around the world. Many of them depict, what Mr C. calls “Great Showdowns”. The showdowns are often of cult favourites, and his ability to capture character likeness with such little detail is incredible. In keeping with his playful style, the showdowns are not actual showdowns per se, more like meetings, where the opposing parties stand and smile at one another. A more enjoyably interpretation of the term, there has not been.

    To see more of Scott C.’s work head over to his website.

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