Category: Cartoon
  1. 22

    Jul 2014

    Aristy Putritami

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    Aristy Putritami aka Arst is an illustrator from Jakarta, Indonesia. I stumbled on her tumblr a while back and was really drawn into the candid illustrations. Many of them feel like an off-the-cuff reply to life. Their earnestness, or rather Arst’s ability to depict such sincere characters, makes her work more emotive and ultimately more engaging.

    To see more of Arst’s work, check out her somewhat neglected deviantArt page, or her regularly updated tumblr.

  2. 17

    Jul 2014

    Adrián Fernández Delgado

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    Today’s slice of illustration inspiration is in the form of Spanish artist Adrián Fernández Delgado. He studied 2D animation at Les Beaux-Arts in Madrid before working as a designer, a programmer and a freelance illustrator.

    In 2008 he signed a comic book deal with publishers, Ankama Éditions, and has gone on to illustrate multiple stories within their Wakfu universe. To date, Mr Delgado’s bibliography includes Le Corbeau Noir, Remington Arc 1: Ush, Tangomango Volume 1: Les premiers pirates, and most recently Tangomango Volume 2 : La gazette du pirate.

    His illustrations are full of energy, colours and characters that appear to be made of rubber. To see more of Mr Delgado’s work check out his blog and Facebook page.

  3. 15

    Jul 2014

    Mary Lundquist

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    Mary Lundquist is an illustrator based in Los Angeles. She graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and is currently working on several children’s books. I assume, one at least, will be based on her character Bunny, whom can be spotted throughout her portfolio. Mrs Lundquist’s style utilise her soft pencil work by adding a simple wash of watercolours, giving her illustrations a real tranquil feeling.

    You can see more of Mary Lundquist’s work on her website.

    A quick thanks goes to our avid Lounge reader, Nicholas, whom bought Mrs Lundquist’ work to our attention. If you have a personal project, or have seen inspiring illustrator you want to shout about, you can email your suggestions to us via our contact page.

  4. 9

    Jul 2014

    Thierry Martin

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    French illustrator Thierry Martin produces wonderful children’s comics. Between 2007 – 2009 He released three anthologies of Le Roman de Renart. Written by Jean-Marc Mathis, it is a modern take based on the centuries old red fox and trickster, Reynard. More recently, partnering with writer Loïc Dauvillier, he has released two books about a young dreamer named Myrmidon.

    Mr Martin’s charming illustrations use clear linework, soft colour pallets with simple flat toning. On his YouTube channel he has a some great videos of him inking his comic pages. You can check out more of Thierry Martin’s illustrations on his blog. He also has a tumblr, where, along side his own work, he post an array of other fine illustrators.

  5. 8

    Jul 2014

    Leo Gibran

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    I wish I could tell you how I first stumbled on Leo Gibran’s work, but I simply cannot remember. However, that should not stop me from singing his praises. Mr Gibran is a working illustrator, based in são paulo, Brazil, predominately in fields of advertising and editorial.

    Mr Gibran’s styles can be divide, somewhat neatly, into two columns. The first is composed of expressive brush work and emotive colour washes, and the second is his more geometric vector work. Both use quirky and dynamic shapes but his vector work, for me, lack the fervour that he seems to effortless have with a brush.

    Check out more of Leo Gibran’s illustrations on his website and blog.

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