1. 17

    Oct 2014

    I’d Love To Draw by Andrew Loomis

    by
    id-love-to-draw-01 id-love-to-draw-02 id-love-to-draw-03 id-love-to-draw-04 id-love-to-draw-05 id-love-to-draw-06 id-love-to-draw-07 id-love-to-draw-08

    I’d Love To Draw is out today in the UK! To celebrate Titan books have kindly sent over some rare photographs of the original book Andrew Loomis created.

    I’d Love To Draw was started by the Andrew Loomis, but he unfortunately died in 1959 before its completion. Held in the Loomis family archives for decades, the book’s existence was entirely unknown outside of the Loomis family – until now. Lovingly restored by a team of experts, including the globally-renowned and respected artist Alex Ross, Titan Books are finally publishing Loomis’ lost legacy. This facsimile edition finally completes the Loomis legacy at long last.

    We will have a full review of the book soon.

  2. 16

    Oct 2014

    Mike Yamada

    by
    mike-yamada-01 mike-yamada-02 mike-yamada-03 mike-yamada-04 mike-yamada-05 mike-yamada-06

    Mike Yamada is a visual development artist for animation, and concept artist for video games. Some of his feature animation work includes Big Hero 6 (2014), How to Train your Dragon (2010), Monsters vs. Aliens (2009), and Kung Fu Panda (2008).

    Alongside his wife, Victoria Ying, he started a design studio called Extracurricular Activities. It houses their beautiful products, such as prints and apparel. They also take their knowledge on the road, holding lectures and workshops. Talking about knowledge, this excellent interview of the couple has back-back great advice any aspiring artist.

    A couple years ago, the pair took to Kickstarter to fund their ambitious children’s book Curiosities: An Illustrated History of Ancestral Oddity. As you can imagine it absolute bulldozed its original goal of $4,000 and went on to receive just under $50,000!

    Mike Yamada’s blog is filled with his concept art and sketches and well worth a gander.

  3. 15

    Oct 2014

    Scott Wills

    by
    scott-wills-01 scott-wills-02 scott-wills-03 scott-wills-04 scott-wills-05 scott-wills-06

    I have recently taken a strong interest in colour theory, and colourist. Trying to understand why certain pallets work and how to come up them. There is a lot to learn from today’s feature. Presenting the work of Scott Wills, who is among other things, a master of colour.

    You may already be familiar with his work, especially if you are a fan of Samurai Jack and Star Wars: Clone Wars, as Mr Wills worked on many of the backgrounds of those productions. His distinct style really helped set apart Samurai Jack from other animations of the time, something which I remember thinking when I first watched the show.

    Scott Wills has also provided background art for The Road to El Dorado (2000), Quest for Camelot (1998), as well as art directing Flushed Away (2006), and Monsters vs. Aliens (2009).

    Fascinatingly many of Mr Wills’ pieces are painted small in scale. With acrylic being his predominately medium of choice, he uses a range of techniques to get the look he wants. There are an excellent group of videos over on YouTube, of Mr Wills working on various Samurai Jack paintings. They are short, averaging around 6 minutes each, but long enough to give you some invaluable insight on how he goes about creating such beautiful backgrounds.

    You can find more of Scott Wills’ work on his blog, CandyCaneLane.

  4. 13

    Oct 2014

    Jens Claessens

    by
    jens-claessens-01 jens-claessens-02 jens-claessens-03 jens-claessens-04 jens-claessens-05 jens-claessens-06

    Presenting the very lush work of Jens Claessens. Based in Antwerp, Belgium, Mr Claessens is a freelance visual development artist. As a freelancer and alongside visual development studio Votla he has worked with companies including Microsoft, Ubisoft, Sony, THQ, Mattel, and Warner Brother Games.

    One of Mr Claessens’ few comic was published in the very nifty mini Comicanthologie, DOLOR, amongst some very good company including Francis Vallejo and Michael Meier. Mr Claessens’ work has also been featured on the packaging for a Belgium bakery, Generous. Which in turn earned them two CCB Awards.

    To find more of Jens Claessens, head over to his website and blog.

  5. 8

    Oct 2014

    Cameron Stewart

    by
    cameron-stewart-01 cameron-stewart-02 cameron-stewart-03 cameron-stewart-04 cameron-stewart-05 cameron-stewart-06

    Today marks the much anticipated release of Batgirl #35. It’s a re-invention of Batgirl from the (Dr Martens) boots up, by the creative team, writer Cameron Stewart, co-writer Brenden Fletcher, artist Babs Tarr, and colorist Jordie Bellaire.

    Succeeding fan favorite Gail Simone would be no easy feat, but as soon as the first image of Batgirl’s new costume was released, the internet went crazy, the likes had never been seen. Within hours there were hundreds of fan art. About a week later there was a blog to showcase the huge amount of artwork and even some cosplay costumes.

    Outside of the bat-mania Cameron Stewart is a very decorated illustrator, with both Eisner Award and Shuster Awards and Eagle Award and Harvey Award nominations. He has worked for all the big comic companies DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics, on titles including B.P.R.D., Catwoman, Batman and Robin, Seaguy, and Seven Soldiers: The Manhattan Guardian.

    In 2007 Mr Stewart released a webcomic called Sin Titulo. The noir mystery-thriller earned him an Eisner Award, and later went on to be published by Dark Horse Comics. Earlier this year it was announced that Cameron Stewart will be illustrating a Fight Club comic. Set to be realsed in 2015, written by the novel’s author Chuck Palahniuk, it will be a direct sequel to the 1999 movie.

    You can find more of Cameron Stewart’s work on his website.

Back to Top