1. 22

    Jul 2014

    Aristy Putritami

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    Aristy Putritami aka Arst is an illustrator from Jakarta, Indonesia. I stumbled on her tumblr a while back and was really drawn into the candid illustrations. Many of them feel like an off-the-cuff reply to life. Their earnestness, or rather Arst’s ability to depict such sincere characters, makes her work more emotive and ultimately more engaging.

    To see more of Arst’s work, check out her somewhat neglected deviantArt page, or her regularly updated tumblr.

  2. 21

    Jul 2014

    Anna Cattish

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    Cat Anett, or more commonly known as Anna Cattish, is an illustrator and animator from Russia. Cattish was part of the Honkfu art collective that produced the motion comic JAM. She has also contributed to the upcoming book, Masters of Anatomy. Her art style is simultaneously cute and edgy with many of her characters exuding attitude. Cattish illustrates in a variety of mediums, predominately colouring digitally, recently however has been producing some really beautiful gauche pieces.

    Anna Cattish can be found on multiple websites including DeviantArt, Blogger, tumblr, but to keep up-to-date with her, it is probably best you follower her on Instagram and Facebook.

  3. 18

    Jul 2014

    M. Sasek (1916 – 1980)

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    Born 16th November 1916, Miroslav Sasek grew up in Prague. After finishing school he wanted to study to become a painter, but his parents were disapproving, so to appease them he decided to studied architecture instead. He did however study drawing and painting with Czech landscape artist Otakar Blažíček, and later in 1947 moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux Arts. Just at the onset of his illustration career, prompted by the 1948 Czech coup, Mr Sasek decided not to return to his homeland and instead emigrate to Munich.

    Whilst earning a living as a graphic artist in advertising and architecture, Mr Sasek paid a visit to Paris, where it suddenly dawned upon him that there were not any books written for children to learn about their city. So in 1957 he created a children’s guide book to Paris, titled This is Paris. In doing so, he began what would become his life’s work. Following the success of This is Paris he went on to produce books on London (1959), Rome (1960), New York (1960) and many others. In total Mr Sasek produced 18 books in the series, with plans of others including Bombay and Canada. Sadly, in 1980 he died while visiting his sister in Switzerland, leaving those plans unrealised.

    The quality of the illustrations, and the success of the series earned Mr Sasek multiple awards over the years, including New York Times Best Illustrated Books of the Year (twice), Society of Illustrators Award for Excellence, and an entry in the International Board on Books for Young People Honour List.

    Obviously the best place to see more of M. Sasek’s work is by picking up one (or more) of his This Is… books, but you can also find further information on the Miroslav Sasek Foundation website, and this great little fan website.

  4. 17

    Jul 2014

    Adrián Fernández Delgado

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    Today’s slice of illustration inspiration is in the form of Spanish artist Adrián Fernández Delgado. He studied 2D animation at Les Beaux-Arts in Madrid before working as a designer, a programmer and a freelance illustrator.

    In 2008 he signed a comic book deal with publishers, Ankama Éditions, and has gone on to illustrate multiple stories within their Wakfu universe. To date, Mr Delgado’s bibliography includes Le Corbeau Noir, Remington Arc 1: Ush, Tangomango Volume 1: Les premiers pirates, and most recently Tangomango Volume 2 : La gazette du pirate.

    His illustrations are full of energy, colours and characters that appear to be made of rubber. To see more of Mr Delgado’s work check out his blog and Facebook page.

  5. 16

    Jul 2014

    Eugène Grasset (1845 – 1917)

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    Alongside the Pre-Raphaelites, Art Nouveau is tied as my favourite art movement. I take every opportunity to see Art Nouveau exhibits, but to be honest, until recently I had never taken much note of Eugène Grasset. This is quite a large oversight, considering he has been called “The Father of Art Nouveau”.

    So who is this pioneering artist? Born 1845 (or possibly 1841) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Eugène Samuel Grasset was surrounded by creativity from a young age. His father was a cabinetmaker and sculptor, and little Eugène learnt to draw under the guise of Francois-Louis David Bocion. In 1861 he went to Zurich to study architecture at the polytechnical school. After which, in 1865, he took what would become an influential visit to Egypt. Throughout his twenties he devoted himself to painting and sculpture.

    At the age of 26 he arrived in Paris, influenced by his travels and a new found love for Japanese Art, Mr Grasset tried his hand at creating ceramics, tapestry, and jewellery. His decorative pieces were crafted from precious materials including ivory and gold. Much of this unique work is considered a cornerstone of Art Nouveau motifs.

    Mr Grasset would later gain recognition as an illustrator due to his contribution to the stories Le Petit Nab (1877) and Histoire de quatre fils Aymon (1883). Quickly moving on to applied arts he designed the facade of the Hôtel de Dumas in Paris, mosaics in Saint Etienne in Braire, and stained glass windows in the Orléans Cathedral. With a multitude of artistic ability to call upon Mr Grasset had a natural affinity to poster design. Fortunate, as French posters design was becoming very popular Stateside, so it was not long before he was contacted by various American companies. His successful commissions led to him illustrating the 1892 Christmas issue of Harper’s Magazine.

    Interesting footnote one of his images, The Wooly Horse, was so popular that Louis Comfort Tiffany was inspired to recreate it in stained glass.

    Mr Grasset spent much of his latter years teaching in various schools across Paris. Many of his students went on to become eminent artist themselves, unsurprisingly, a lot of them within the Art Nouveau movement. His versatility, instincts and ability not only influenced those whom he had taught, but also prominent artist like Alphonse Mucha, and left a stirring mark on the Arts and Artists that followed.

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