1. 24

    Jul 2014

    Really Cheap and Really Useful Books for Illustrators

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    We are going to do something a little different for today’s post. I recently picked up a copy of The Anatomy of Costume from Amazon for the enthralling price of 1 pence. A perfectly good book, in a perfectly acceptable condition. This got me thinking, how great it would if there were a whole list of useful art books that were being sold for a penny? I did a little Google-fu to see what was out there already, after not finding anything I decided to make my own list and share it with you, my fellow Loungers.

    This list of 30 books breaks down into four main categories, Reference, Tutorial, Fine Art and Other. I specifically chose books from a broad range of creative fields and would have loved to throw in a couple books on design or architecture, but sadly could not find anything worthy for so cheep.

    Just in case some of you are thinking, what is the point of buying a book when you have a wealth of reference of the internet? Firstly, as shocking as it may seem, not everything is on the internet; sometimes that dissected image of that flower you need can only be found in a book. Personally, I prefer working with a book in front of me rather than a screen. Ultimately buying books will introduce you to things you weren’t looking for, which is the best way to expand your pool of inspiration. Not to mention, these books are a penny, you cheapskate!

    I should mention that I own a lot of the books in this list, most of which I spent a lot more than a penny to buy. Suffice to say their value is much higher than their price tag.

    Enough rambling, here is the list:

    Reference

    General

    Costume

    History

    Tutorial

    Fine Art

    General

    Artist

    Other

  2. 22

    Jul 2014

    Aristy Putritami

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    Aristy Putritami aka Arst is an illustrator from Jakarta, Indonesia. I stumbled on her tumblr a while back and was really drawn into the candid illustrations. Many of them feel like an off-the-cuff reply to life. Their earnestness, or rather Arst’s ability to depict such sincere characters, makes her work more emotive and ultimately more engaging.

    To see more of Arst’s work, check out her somewhat neglected deviantArt page, or her regularly updated tumblr.

  3. 21

    Jul 2014

    Anna Cattish

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    Cat Anett, or more commonly known as Anna Cattish, is an illustrator and animator from Russia. Cattish was part of the Honkfu art collective that produced the motion comic JAM. She has also contributed to the upcoming book, Masters of Anatomy. Her art style is simultaneously cute and edgy with many of her characters exuding attitude. Cattish illustrates in a variety of mediums, predominately colouring digitally, recently however has been producing some really beautiful gauche pieces.

    Anna Cattish can be found on multiple websites including DeviantArt, Blogger, tumblr, but to keep up-to-date with her, it is probably best you follower her on Instagram and Facebook.

  4. 18

    Jul 2014

    M. Sasek (1916 – 1980)

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    Born 16th November 1916, Miroslav Sasek grew up in Prague. After finishing school he wanted to study to become a painter, but his parents were disapproving, so to appease them he decided to studied architecture instead. He did however study drawing and painting with Czech landscape artist Otakar Blažíček, and later in 1947 moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux Arts. Just at the onset of his illustration career, prompted by the 1948 Czech coup, Mr Sasek decided not to return to his homeland and instead emigrate to Munich.

    Whilst earning a living as a graphic artist in advertising and architecture, Mr Sasek paid a visit to Paris, where it suddenly dawned upon him that there were not any books written for children to learn about their city. So in 1957 he created a children’s guide book to Paris, titled This is Paris. In doing so, he began what would become his life’s work. Following the success of This is Paris he went on to produce books on London (1959), Rome (1960), New York (1960) and many others. In total Mr Sasek produced 18 books in the series, with plans of others including Bombay and Canada. Sadly, in 1980 he died while visiting his sister in Switzerland, leaving those plans unrealised.

    The quality of the illustrations, and the success of the series earned Mr Sasek multiple awards over the years, including New York Times Best Illustrated Books of the Year (twice), Society of Illustrators Award for Excellence, and an entry in the International Board on Books for Young People Honour List.

    Obviously the best place to see more of M. Sasek’s work is by picking up one (or more) of his This Is… books, but you can also find further information on the Miroslav Sasek Foundation website, and this great little fan website.

  5. 17

    Jul 2014

    Adrián Fernández Delgado

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    Today’s slice of illustration inspiration is in the form of Spanish artist Adrián Fernández Delgado. He studied 2D animation at Les Beaux-Arts in Madrid before working as a designer, a programmer and a freelance illustrator.

    In 2008 he signed a comic book deal with publishers, Ankama Éditions, and has gone on to illustrate multiple stories within their Wakfu universe. To date, Mr Delgado’s bibliography includes Le Corbeau Noir, Remington Arc 1: Ush, Tangomango Volume 1: Les premiers pirates, and most recently Tangomango Volume 2 : La gazette du pirate.

    His illustrations are full of energy, colours and characters that appear to be made of rubber. To see more of Mr Delgado’s work check out his blog and Facebook page.

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