1. 26

    Jan 2015

    Matt Taylor

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    Matt Taylor is a “Tall, semi-dashing” illustrator. At least that is the description on his twitter profile.

    Based in the sunny countryside of Sussex Taylor has created illustrations for huge brands including Adidas, Google, Sony, Paramount Pictures and Penguin Books. Matt Taylor is however, best know for his Americana inspired movie posters for Gallery1988 and Mondo.

    Taylor has also self-published a short comic titled, The Great Salt Lake, about a shipwrecked cast away struggling to make his way home. Recently Taylor produced interior art for Ales Kot’s Zero, published by Image.

    You can find more of Matt Taylor’s on his website and tumblr.

  2. 21

    Jan 2015

    Greg Wright

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    Greg Wright is a Philadelphia-based freelance illustrator. A University of the Arts graduate, Wright is the head designer, as well as a contributor, for the t-shirt company, InksterInc. Wright’s work utilises a restrained pallet, often without any shading. His simplified shapes and limited details makes his illustrations ideal for pretty much any product he chooses to put them on. All of which combines to make his Society6 shop off-limits for me, and only fit for those who have some self-control, or deep pockets.

    You can find more of Greg Wright’s illustrations on his website and tumblr.

  3. 19

    Jan 2015

    Manga Mondays ~ Nicolas Nemiri

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    Nicolas Nemiri was born 1975 in Mulhouse, France. He studied at the Ecole Européenne Supérieure de l’Image in Angoulême. After graduating and moving to Japan, at the age of 20 he was making money by doing odd jobs, including illustrating for Japanese fashion magazines.

    In 1998 writer Jean David Morvan saw some of Nemiri’s drawings and asked him to work on the comic series Reality show. Nemiri was enthusiastic but decided to turn down Morvan’s offer. However, he later accepted the offer to work on the futuristic series Je suis morte (I died), published by Glénat. This successful collaboration marked the beginning of a long working relationship with Morvan. Creating two more series, Hyper l’hippo (2005) and Annie Zoo (2009).

    Nemiri has stated some of his artistic influences include European artist Jean Giraud (Moebius), Hugo Pratt and André Franquin as well as Japanese artist Katsuhiro Otomo, Hiroaki Samura, Shou Tajima. All of whom you can be seen elements of across his portfolio.

    Nicolas Nemiri is currently exhibiting alongside illustrator Jean-Philippe Kalonji at the Galerie Glenat in Paris. It is running throughout January until the 31st.

    You can see more of Nemiri’s work on his tumblr and blogspot.

  4. 13

    Jan 2015

    Nicholas Kole

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    Rhode Island resident, Nicholas Kole, is an illustrator and character designer. He studied illustration at the Rhode Island School of Design. Kole graduated in 2009, and since has gone on to work with games companies, animation studios and comic publishers. Some of his clients include Riot Games, Electronic Arts, Disney Publishing, Hasbro, Puma and Dark Horse Comics.

    In 2013 Kole worked with Disney Publishing to produce ridiculously beautiful illustrations for the children’s book The Curse of Maleficent: The Tale of a Sleeping Beauty. Much of 2014 he spent as the lead artist for an interactive webcomic called The Dawngate Chronicles, for Waystone Games.

    Nicholas Kole has spread his art across the net and can be found on Tumblr, DeviantArt, Blogger, Behance and twitter.

  5. 9

    Jan 2015

    Paul César Helleu (1859 – 1927)

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    Amid much of Paul César Helleu’s lifetime he was famous on both sides of the Atlantic. His artistry was praised by fellow impressionist painters Manet, Monet and Renoir. Yet, his name seems is less widely known to the public today.

    Helleu was an exceptional oil painter, a skilled draftsman adept in pastel and maestro of drypoint. He was an influential part of the Impressionist movement, who created many still lifes, landscapes and portraits, most famously of beautiful society women of the Belle Époque.

    Born 1859 in Vannes, Brittany, France. Helleu went to Paris to begin his academic training in art. At age 16, he was admitted to the École des Beaux-Arts where he studied with Jean-Léon Gérôme. Attending an Impressionist exhibition he met artist John Singer Sargent, James McNeill Whistler, and Claude Monet for the first time. The showcased works were modern, employing the bold alla prima technique. All of which made a lasting impact on Helleu.

    After graduating, in order to make some money, Helleu started working for Théodore Deck hand-painting fine decorative plates. All the while Helleu was becoming more and more discourage. He had not sold a single painting and was on the verge of abandoning his studies. Upon hearing this, his now close friend, John Singer Sargent went to Helleu, priased his techniques and bought a one of his pieces for a thousand-franc note.

    In typical artist fashion, after being commissioned to paint a young socialite named Alice Guèrin, Helleu feel in love with her and two years later they were married. They became part of French social elites, and Guèrin would introduce Helleu to many aristocratic circles of Paris.

    In 1885, on a trip to London, Helleu was introduction to James Jacques Tissot. This meeting opened up Helleu’s eyes to the possibilities of drypoint etching with a diamond point stylus directly on a copper plate. Embracing this technique wholly, Helleu would apply his same dynamic pastel style to his etching. His prints were very popular, with the advantage to create several proofs, people would often give them to friends and relatives as gifts. Over the course of his career, Helleu produced more than 2,000 drypoint prints.

    Reaching a celebrated status internationally, in 1904 he was awarded France’s highest decoration, the Légion d’honneur. On top of this recognition he was also made an honorary member of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts.

    In 1920 Helleu exhibited his work in New York City, but the experience brought a sudden realization for him that the Belle Époque was over. Helleu felt that his had lost touch and after his return to France he destroyed nearly all of his copper plates. However, a few years later he started planning a new exhibition with Jean-Louis Forain. Sadly the exhibition never came to fruition when in 1927 Helleu died.

    There is a few places you can find out more about Paul César Helleu, a nice collection of his work and more information can be found here and here. There is also a beautiful book of his work by Frederique de Watrigant both in English and French.

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